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Foundation Year  

Foundation Year Description

The Science content includes the three strands of science understanding, science inquiry skills and science as a human endeavour. The three strands of the curriculum are interrelated and their content is taught in an integrated way. The order and detail in which the content descriptions are organised into teaching and learning programs are decisions to be made by the teacher. Inc

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The Science content includes the three strands of science understanding, science inquiry skills and science as a human endeavour. The three strands of the curriculum are interrelated and their content is taught in an integrated way. The order and detail in which the content descriptions are organised into teaching and learning programs are decisions to be made by the teacher.

Incorporating the key ideas of science

From Foundation to Year 2, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns, and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena.

In Foundation, students observe and describe the behaviours and properties of everyday objects, materials and living things. They explore change in the world around them, including changes that impact on them, such as the weather, and changes they can effect, such as making things move or change shape. They learn that seeking answers to questions they pose and making observations is a core part of science and use their senses to gather different types of information.

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Science and Religion influence how we understand the world and live in the world. Science and Religion are both important to human well-being. They are not at odds but are united in the continuing search for truth in unlocking the mysteries of the cosmos. While Science and Religion may have different starting points and use different methods, they are nevertheless complementary and address the same world realities.

Pope John Paul II reminds us that 'Science can purify religion from error and superstition; religion can purify science from idolatry and false absolutes. Each can draw the other into a wider world, a world in which both can flourish.' 
Embedding Catholic perspectives in the teaching and learning of Science are grounded in the belief that each learner’s knowledge, deep understanding, skills and values about justice, peace and ecological stewardship are developed across the curriculum.

Christian Anthropology identifies the human person as a co-creator with God reflected in the Science Curriculum characterised by creative responses to complex problems; collaborative and relational approaches to learning and positive action for, and in, the broader community.

Catholic Epistemology orientates scientific learning and teaching towards practical scientific and technological knowledge that is ethical connecting faith and life, life and culture.

Catholic View of Cosmology emphasises stewardship and sacramentality and requires learners to take responsibility to cultivate creative solutions to complex problems of life and living.

When embedding Catholic Perspectives in the Science curriculum teachers look for the most appropriate and powerful opportunity that develops a natural understanding of the connection between Science and Religion.

Some people believe that Science and Religion are diametrically opposed. If the Catholic church were opposed to Science then there would be very few Catholic scientists, no scientific research by Catholic institutions, but this is not the case. Since the mid 19th Century, the Catholic church has been actively involved in demonstrating how Religion is not opposed to Science. As a patron of the Sciences, the Catholic church has been involved in scientific pursuits, particularly through the Vatican Observatory.

Historically, Catholics are numbered among the most important scientists of all time, including Rene Descartes, Blaise Pascal and Laura Bassi. As an intuitive physicist, Galileo understood and communicated the planetary system and was famously condemned by theologians whose understanding of world structure was founded in a literal interpretation of Sacred Scripture. If only they had recalled St Augustine and St Thomas Aquinas who recognised that Scripture often speaks the truth about creation in a nonliteral, non-scientific way. The ‘sun may rise’ when reading scripture and in daily speak, even though scientifically it is the earth that turns and revolves around the sun.

The scientist credited with proposing in the 1930s what came to be known as the Big Bang Theory of the origin of the universe was Georges Lemaitre, a Belgian physicist and Roman Catholic priest.
Catholic Education Resource Centre  

On 18th November 2017, Pope Francis received the participants in the Plenary of the Pontifical Council for Culture, dedicated to the theme “The future of humanity: new challenges to anthropology”.

Pope Francis: Science and technology have helped us further the boundaries of knowledge of nature and, in particular, of the human being. But they alone are not enough to provide all the answers. Today, we increasingly realize that it is necessary to draw on the treasures of wisdom preserved in religious traditions, popular wisdom, literature and the arts, which touch the depths of the mystery of human existence, not forgetting, but rather rediscovering those contained in philosophy and in theology.

STEM Position Statement

Foundation Year Content Descriptions

Science Understanding
Biological sciences

Living things have basic needs, including food and water

Chemical sciences

Objects are made of materials that haveproperties

Earth and space sciences

Daily and seasonal changes in ouraffect everyday life

Physical sciences

The way objects move depends on a variety of factors, including their size and shape

Science as a Human Endeavour
Nature and development of science

Science involves observing, asking questions about, and describing changes in, objects and events

Science Inquiry Skills
Questioning and predicting

Pose and respond to questions aboutobjects and events

Planning and conducting

Participate in guided investigations and make observations using the

Processing and analysing data and information

Engage in discussions about observations and represent ideas

Communicating

Share observations and ideas

Show subject-specific achievement standard

Foundation Year Achievement Standard

By the end of the Foundation year, students describe the properties and behaviour of familiar objects. They suggest how the environment affects them and other living things.

Students share and reflect on observations, and ask and respond to questions about familiar objects and events.

Show sub-strand-specific achievement standard

Foundation Year Work Sample Portfolios

 

Year 1  

Year 1 Description

The science inquiry skills and science as a human endeavour strands are described across a two-year band. In their planning, schools and teachers refer to the expectations outlined in the achievement standard and also to the content of the science understanding strand for the relevant year level to ensure that these two strands are addressed over the two-year period. The three strands of the cu

Read full description ›

The science inquiry skills and science as a human endeavour strands are described across a two-year band. In their planning, schools and teachers refer to the expectations outlined in the achievement standard and also to the content of the science understanding strand for the relevant year level to ensure that these two strands are addressed over the two-year period. The three strands of the curriculum are interrelated and their content is taught in an integrated way. The order and detail in which the content descriptions are organised into teaching and learning programs are decisions to be made by the teacher.

Incorporating the key ideas of science

From Foundation to Year 2, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns, and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena.

In Year 1, students infer simple cause-and-effect relationships from their observations and experiences, and begin to link events and phenomena with observable effects and to ask questions. They observe changes that can be large or small and happen quickly or slowly. They explore the properties of familiar objects and phenomena, identifying similarities and differences. Students begin to value counting as a means of comparing observations, and are introduced to ways of organising their observations.

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Science and Religion influence how we understand the world and live in the world. Science and Religion are both important to human well-being. They are not at odds but are united in the continuing search for truth in unlocking the mysteries of the cosmos. While Science and Religion may have different starting points and use different methods, they are nevertheless complementary and address the same world realities.

Pope John Paul II reminds us that 'Science can purify religion from error and superstition; religion can purify science from idolatry and false absolutes. Each can draw the other into a wider world, a world in which both can flourish.' 
Embedding Catholic perspectives in the teaching and learning of Science are grounded in the belief that each learner’s knowledge, deep understanding, skills and values about justice, peace and ecological stewardship are developed across the curriculum.

Christian Anthropology identifies the human person as a co-creator with God reflected in the Science Curriculum characterised by creative responses to complex problems; collaborative and relational approaches to learning and positive action for, and in, the broader community.

Catholic Epistemology orientates scientific learning and teaching towards practical scientific and technological knowledge that is ethical connecting faith and life, life and culture.

Catholic View of Cosmology emphasises stewardship and sacramentality and requires learners to take responsibility to cultivate creative solutions to complex problems of life and living.

When embedding Catholic Perspectives in the Science curriculum teachers look for the most appropriate and powerful opportunity that develops a natural understanding of the connection between Science and Religion.

Some people believe that Science and Religion are diametrically opposed. If the Catholic church were opposed to Science then there would be very few Catholic scientists, no scientific research by Catholic institutions, but this is not the case. Since the mid 19th Century, the Catholic church has been actively involved in demonstrating how Religion is not opposed to Science. As a patron of the Sciences, the Catholic church has been involved in scientific pursuits, particularly through the Vatican Observatory.

Historically, Catholics are numbered among the most important scientists of all time, including Rene Descartes, Blaise Pascal and Laura Bassi. As an intuitive physicist, Galileo understood and communicated the planetary system and was famously condemned by theologians whose understanding of world structure was founded in a literal interpretation of Sacred Scripture. If only they had recalled St Augustine and St Thomas Aquinas who recognised that Scripture often speaks the truth about creation in a nonliteral, non-scientific way. The ‘sun may rise’ when reading scripture and in daily speak, even though scientifically it is the earth that turns and revolves around the sun.

The scientist credited with proposing in the 1930s what came to be known as the Big Bang Theory of the origin of the universe was Georges Lemaitre, a Belgian physicist and Roman Catholic priest.
Catholic Education Resource Centre  

On 18th November 2017, Pope Francis received the participants in the Plenary of the Pontifical Council for Culture, dedicated to the theme “The future of humanity: new challenges to anthropology”.

Pope Francis: Science and technology have helped us further the boundaries of knowledge of nature and, in particular, of the human being. But they alone are not enough to provide all the answers. Today, we increasingly realize that it is necessary to draw on the treasures of wisdom preserved in religious traditions, popular wisdom, literature and the arts, which touch the depths of the mystery of human existence, not forgetting, but rather rediscovering those contained in philosophy and in theology.

STEM Position Statement

Year 1 Content Descriptions

Science Understanding
Biological sciences

Living things have a variety of external features

Living things live in different places where their needs are met

Chemical sciences

Everyday materials can be physically changed in a variety of ways

Earth and space sciences

changes occur in the sky and landscape

Physical sciences

Light and sound are produced by a range of sources and can be sensed

Science as a Human Endeavour
Nature and development of science

Science involves observing, asking questions about, and describing changes in, objects and events

Use and influence of science

People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for theirand living things

Science Inquiry Skills
Questioning and predicting

Pose and respond to questions, and make predictions aboutobjects and events

Planning and conducting

Participate in guided investigations to explore and answer questions


Use informal measurements to collect and record observations, usingas appropriate

Processing and analysing data and information

Use a range of methods to sort information, including drawings and provided tables and through discussion, compare observations with predictions

Evaluating

Compare observations with those of others

Communicating

Represent and communicate observations and ideas in a variety of ways

Show subject-specific achievement standard

Year 1 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 1, students describe objects and events that they encounter in their everyday lives, and the effects of interacting with materials and objects. They describe changes in their local environment and how different places meet the needs of living things.

Students respond to questions, make predictions, and participate in guided investigations of everyday phenomena. They follow instructions to record and sort their observations and share them with others.

Show sub-strand-specific achievement standard

Year 1 Work Sample Portfolios

 

Year 2  

Year 2 Description

The science inquiry skills and science as a human endeavour strands are described across a two-year band. In their planning, schools and teachers refer to the expectations outlined in the achievement standard and also to the content of the science understanding strand for the relevant year level to ensure that these two strands are addressed over the two-year period. The three strands of the cu

Read full description ›

The science inquiry skills and science as a human endeavour strands are described across a two-year band. In their planning, schools and teachers refer to the expectations outlined in the achievement standard and also to the content of the science understanding strand for the relevant year level to ensure that these two strands are addressed over the two-year period. The three strands of the curriculum are interrelated and their content is taught in an integrated way. The order and detail in which the content descriptions are organised into teaching and learning programs are decisions to be made by the teacher.

Incorporating the key ideas of science

From Foundation to Year 2, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns, and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena.

In Year 2, students describe the components of simple systems, such as stationary objects subjected to pushes or pulls, or combinations of materials, and show how objects and materials interact through direct manipulation. They observe patterns of growth and change in living things, and describe patterns and make predictions. They explore the use of resources from Earth and are introduced to the idea of the flow of matter when considering how water is used. They use counting and informal measurements to make and compare observations and begin to recognise that organising these observations in tables makes it easier to show patterns.

Hide full description ›

Science and Religion influence how we understand the world and live in the world. Science and Religion are both important to human well-being. They are not at odds but are united in the continuing search for truth in unlocking the mysteries of the cosmos. While Science and Religion may have different starting points and use different methods, they are nevertheless complementary and address the same world realities.

Pope John Paul II reminds us that 'Science can purify religion from error and superstition; religion can purify science from idolatry and false absolutes. Each can draw the other into a wider world, a world in which both can flourish.' 
Embedding Catholic perspectives in the teaching and learning of Science are grounded in the belief that each learner’s knowledge, deep understanding, skills and values about justice, peace and ecological stewardship are developed across the curriculum.

Christian Anthropology identifies the human person as a co-creator with God reflected in the Science Curriculum characterised by creative responses to complex problems; collaborative and relational approaches to learning and positive action for, and in, the broader community.

Catholic Epistemology orientates scientific learning and teaching towards practical scientific and technological knowledge that is ethical connecting faith and life, life and culture.

Catholic View of Cosmology emphasises stewardship and sacramentality and requires learners to take responsibility to cultivate creative solutions to complex problems of life and living.

When embedding Catholic Perspectives in the Science curriculum teachers look for the most appropriate and powerful opportunity that develops a natural understanding of the connection between Science and Religion.

Some people believe that Science and Religion are diametrically opposed. If the Catholic church were opposed to Science then there would be very few Catholic scientists, no scientific research by Catholic institutions, but this is not the case. Since the mid 19th Century, the Catholic church has been actively involved in demonstrating how Religion is not opposed to Science. As a patron of the Sciences, the Catholic church has been involved in scientific pursuits, particularly through the Vatican Observatory.

Historically, Catholics are numbered among the most important scientists of all time, including Rene Descartes, Blaise Pascal and Laura Bassi. As an intuitive physicist, Galileo understood and communicated the planetary system and was famously condemned by theologians whose understanding of world structure was founded in a literal interpretation of Sacred Scripture. If only they had recalled St Augustine and St Thomas Aquinas who recognised that Scripture often speaks the truth about creation in a nonliteral, non-scientific way. The ‘sun may rise’ when reading scripture and in daily speak, even though scientifically it is the earth that turns and revolves around the sun.

The scientist credited with proposing in the 1930s what came to be known as the Big Bang Theory of the origin of the universe was Georges Lemaitre, a Belgian physicist and Roman Catholic priest.
Catholic Education Resource Centre  

On 18th November 2017, Pope Francis received the participants in the Plenary of the Pontifical Council for Culture, dedicated to the theme “The future of humanity: new challenges to anthropology”.

Pope Francis: Science and technology have helped us further the boundaries of knowledge of nature and, in particular, of the human being. But they alone are not enough to provide all the answers. Today, we increasingly realize that it is necessary to draw on the treasures of wisdom preserved in religious traditions, popular wisdom, literature and the arts, which touch the depths of the mystery of human existence, not forgetting, but rather rediscovering those contained in philosophy and in theology.

STEM Position Statement

Year 2 Content Descriptions

Science Understanding
Biological sciences

Living things grow, change and have offspring similar to themselves

Chemical sciences

Different materials can be combined for a particular purpose

Earth and space sciences

Earth’s resources are used in a variety of ways

Physical sciences

A push or a pull affects how an object moves or changes shape

Science as a Human Endeavour
Nature and development of science

Science involves observing, asking questions about, and describing changes in, objects and events

Use and influence of science

People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for theirand living things

Science Inquiry Skills
Questioning and predicting

Pose and respond to questions, and make predictions aboutobjects and events

Planning and conducting

Participate in guided investigations to explore and answer questions


Use informal measurements to collect and record observations, usingas appropriate

Processing and analysing data and information

Use a range of methods to sort information, including drawings and provided tables and through discussion, compare observations with predictions

Evaluating

Compare observations with those of others

Communicating

Represent and communicate observations and ideas in a variety of ways

Show subject-specific achievement standard

Year 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students describe changes to objects, materials and living things. They identify that certain materials and resources have different uses and describe examples of where science is used in people’s daily lives.

Students pose and respond to questions about their experiences and predict outcomes of investigations. They use informal measurements to make and compare observations. They record and represent observations and communicate ideas in a variety of ways.

Show sub-strand-specific achievement standard

Year 2 Work Sample Portfolios

 

Year 3  

Year 3 Description

The science inquiry skills and science as a human endeavour strands are described across a two-year band. In their planning, schools and teachers refer to the expectations outlined in the achievement standard and also to the content of the science understanding strand for the relevant year level to ensure that these two strands are addressed over the two-year period. The three strands of the cu

Read full description ›

The science inquiry skills and science as a human endeavour strands are described across a two-year band. In their planning, schools and teachers refer to the expectations outlined in the achievement standard and also to the content of the science understanding strand for the relevant year level to ensure that these two strands are addressed over the two-year period. The three strands of the curriculum are interrelated and their content is taught in an integrated way. The order and detail in which the content descriptions are organised into teaching and learning programs are decisions to be made by the teacher.

Incorporating the key ideas of science

Over Years 3 to 6, students develop their understanding of a range of systems operating at different time and geographic scales.

In Year 3, students observe heat and its effects on solids and liquids and begin to develop an understanding of energy flows through simple systems. In observing day and night, they develop an appreciation of regular and predictable cycles. Students order their observations by grouping and classifying; in classifying things as living or non-living they begin to recognise that classifications are not always easy to define or apply. They begin to quantify their observations to enable comparison, and learn more sophisticated ways of identifying and representing relationships, including the use of tables and graphs to identify trends. They use their understanding of relationships between components of simple systems to make predictions.

Hide full description ›

Science and Religion influence how we understand the world and live in the world. Science and Religion are both important to human well-being. They are not at odds but are united in the continuing search for truth in unlocking the mysteries of the cosmos. While Science and Religion may have different starting points and use different methods, they are nevertheless complementary and address the same world realities.

Pope John Paul II reminds us that 'Science can purify religion from error and superstition; religion can purify science from idolatry and false absolutes. Each can draw the other into a wider world, a world in which both can flourish.' 
Embedding Catholic perspectives in the teaching and learning of Science are grounded in the belief that each learner’s knowledge, deep understanding, skills and values about justice, peace and ecological stewardship are developed across the curriculum.

Christian Anthropology identifies the human person as a co-creator with God reflected in the Science Curriculum characterised by creative responses to complex problems; collaborative and relational approaches to learning and positive action for, and in, the broader community.

Catholic Epistemology orientates scientific learning and teaching towards practical scientific and technological knowledge that is ethical connecting faith and life, life and culture.

Catholic View of Cosmology emphasises stewardship and sacramentality and requires learners to take responsibility to cultivate creative solutions to complex problems of life and living.

When embedding Catholic Perspectives in the Science curriculum teachers look for the most appropriate and powerful opportunity that develops a natural understanding of the connection between Science and Religion.

Some people believe that Science and Religion are diametrically opposed. If the Catholic church were opposed to Science then there would be very few Catholic scientists, no scientific research by Catholic institutions, but this is not the case. Since the mid 19th Century, the Catholic church has been actively involved in demonstrating how Religion is not opposed to Science. As a patron of the Sciences, the Catholic church has been involved in scientific pursuits, particularly through the Vatican Observatory.

Historically, Catholics are numbered among the most important scientists of all time, including Rene Descartes, Blaise Pascal and Laura Bassi. As an intuitive physicist, Galileo understood and communicated the planetary system and was famously condemned by theologians whose understanding of world structure was founded in a literal interpretation of Sacred Scripture. If only they had recalled St Augustine and St Thomas Aquinas who recognised that Scripture often speaks the truth about creation in a nonliteral, non-scientific way. The ‘sun may rise’ when reading scripture and in daily speak, even though scientifically it is the earth that turns and revolves around the sun.

The scientist credited with proposing in the 1930s what came to be known as the Big Bang Theory of the origin of the universe was Georges Lemaitre, a Belgian physicist and Roman Catholic priest.
Catholic Education Resource Centre  

On 18th November 2017, Pope Francis received the participants in the Plenary of the Pontifical Council for Culture, dedicated to the theme “The future of humanity: new challenges to anthropology”.

Pope Francis: Science and technology have helped us further the boundaries of knowledge of nature and, in particular, of the human being. But they alone are not enough to provide all the answers. Today, we increasingly realize that it is necessary to draw on the treasures of wisdom preserved in religious traditions, popular wisdom, literature and the arts, which touch the depths of the mystery of human existence, not forgetting, but rather rediscovering those contained in philosophy and in theology.

STEM Position Statement

Year 3 Content Descriptions

Science Understanding
Biological sciences

Living things can be grouped on the basis offeatures and can be distinguished from non-living things

Chemical sciences

A change of state between solid and liquid can be caused by adding or removing heat

Earth and space sciences

Earth’s rotation on its axis causes regular changes, including night and day

Physical sciences

Heat can be produced in many ways and can move from one object to another

Science as a Human Endeavour
Nature and development of science

Science involves making predictions and describing patterns and relationships

Use and influence of science

Science knowledge helps people tothe effect of their actions

Science Inquiry Skills
Questioning and predicting

With guidance, identify questions incontexts that can be investigated scientifically and make predictions based on prior knowledge

Planning and conducting

With guidance, plan and conduct scientific investigations to find answers to questions, considering the safe use of appropriate materials and equipment


Consider the elements of fair tests and use formal measurements andas appropriate, to make and record observations accurately

Processing and analysing data and information

Use a range of methods including tables and simple column graphs to representand to identify patterns and trends


Compare results with predictions, suggesting possible reasons for findings

Evaluating

investigations, including whether a test was fair or not

Communicating

Represent and communicate observations, ideas and findings using formal and informal representations

Show subject-specific achievement standard

Year 3 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 3, students use their understanding of the movement of Earth, materials and the behaviour of heat to suggest explanations for everyday observations. They group living things based on observable features and distinguish them from non-living things. They describe how they can use science investigations to respond to questions.

Students use their experiences to identify questions and make predictions about scientific investigations. They follow procedures to collect and record observations and suggest possible reasons for their findings, based on patterns in their data. They describe how safety and fairness were considered and they use diagrams and other representations to communicate their ideas.

Show sub-strand-specific achievement standard

Year 3 Work Sample Portfolios

 

Year 4  

Year 4 Description

The science inquiry skills and science as a human endeavour strands are described across a two-year band. In their planning, schools and teachers refer to the expectations outlined in the achievement standard and also to the content of the science understanding strand for the relevant year level to ensure that these two strands are addressed over the two-year period. The three strands of the cu

Read full description ›

The science inquiry skills and science as a human endeavour strands are described across a two-year band. In their planning, schools and teachers refer to the expectations outlined in the achievement standard and also to the content of the science understanding strand for the relevant year level to ensure that these two strands are addressed over the two-year period. The three strands of the curriculum are interrelated and their content is taught in an integrated way. The order and detail in which the content descriptions are organised into teaching and learning programs are decisions to be made by the teacher.

Incorporating the key ideas of science

Over Years 3 to 6, students develop their understanding of a range of systems operating at different time and geographic scales.

In Year 4, students broaden their understanding of classification and form and function through an exploration of the properties of natural and processed materials. They learn that forces include non-contact forces and begin to appreciate that some interactions result from phenomena that can’t be seen with the naked eye. They begin to appreciate that current systems, such as Earth’s surface, have characteristics that have resulted from past changes and that living things form part of systems. They understand that some systems change in predictable ways, such as through cycles. They apply their knowledge to make predictions based on interactions within systems, including those involving the actions of humans.

Hide full description ›

Science and Religion influence how we understand the world and live in the world. Science and Religion are both important to human well-being. They are not at odds but are united in the continuing search for truth in unlocking the mysteries of the cosmos. While Science and Religion may have different starting points and use different methods, they are nevertheless complementary and address the same world realities.

Pope John Paul II reminds us that 'Science can purify religion from error and superstition; religion can purify science from idolatry and false absolutes. Each can draw the other into a wider world, a world in which both can flourish.' 
Embedding Catholic perspectives in the teaching and learning of Science are grounded in the belief that each learner’s knowledge, deep understanding, skills and values about justice, peace and ecological stewardship are developed across the curriculum.

Christian Anthropology identifies the human person as a co-creator with God reflected in the Science Curriculum characterised by creative responses to complex problems; collaborative and relational approaches to learning and positive action for, and in, the broader community.

Catholic Epistemology orientates scientific learning and teaching towards practical scientific and technological knowledge that is ethical connecting faith and life, life and culture.

Catholic View of Cosmology emphasises stewardship and sacramentality and requires learners to take responsibility to cultivate creative solutions to complex problems of life and living.

When embedding Catholic Perspectives in the Science curriculum teachers look for the most appropriate and powerful opportunity that develops a natural understanding of the connection between Science and Religion.

Some people believe that Science and Religion are diametrically opposed. If the Catholic church were opposed to Science then there would be very few Catholic scientists, no scientific research by Catholic institutions, but this is not the case. Since the mid 19th Century, the Catholic church has been actively involved in demonstrating how Religion is not opposed to Science. As a patron of the Sciences, the Catholic church has been involved in scientific pursuits, particularly through the Vatican Observatory.

Historically, Catholics are numbered among the most important scientists of all time, including Rene Descartes, Blaise Pascal and Laura Bassi. As an intuitive physicist, Galileo understood and communicated the planetary system and was famously condemned by theologians whose understanding of world structure was founded in a literal interpretation of Sacred Scripture. If only they had recalled St Augustine and St Thomas Aquinas who recognised that Scripture often speaks the truth about creation in a nonliteral, non-scientific way. The ‘sun may rise’ when reading scripture and in daily speak, even though scientifically it is the earth that turns and revolves around the sun.

The scientist credited with proposing in the 1930s what came to be known as the Big Bang Theory of the origin of the universe was Georges Lemaitre, a Belgian physicist and Roman Catholic priest.
Catholic Education Resource Centre  

On 18th November 2017, Pope Francis received the participants in the Plenary of the Pontifical Council for Culture, dedicated to the theme “The future of humanity: new challenges to anthropology”.

Pope Francis: Science and technology have helped us further the boundaries of knowledge of nature and, in particular, of the human being. But they alone are not enough to provide all the answers. Today, we increasingly realize that it is necessary to draw on the treasures of wisdom preserved in religious traditions, popular wisdom, literature and the arts, which touch the depths of the mystery of human existence, not forgetting, but rather rediscovering those contained in philosophy and in theology.

STEM Position Statement

Year 4 Content Descriptions

Science Understanding
Biological sciences

Living things have life cycles

Living things depend on each other and theto survive

Chemical sciences

Natural andhave a range of physical properties that can influence their use

Earth and space sciences

Earth’s surface changes over time as a result of natural processes and human activity

Physical sciences

Forces can be exerted by one object on another through direct contact or from a distance

Science as a Human Endeavour
Nature and development of science

Science involves making predictions and describing patterns and relationships

Use and influence of science

Science knowledge helps people tothe effect of their actions

Science Inquiry Skills
Questioning and predicting

With guidance, identify questions incontexts that can be investigated scientifically and make predictions based on prior knowledge

Planning and conducting

With guidance, plan and conduct scientific investigations to find answers to questions, considering the safe use of appropriate materials and equipment