Religious Education

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Prep Year  

Prep Year Description

The Religion Curriculum P-12 involves four strands: Sacred Texts, Beliefs, Church and Christian Life. These strands are interrelated and are taught in an integrated way, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. In Prep, students learn about some Old Testament and New Testament stories that tell of a God of love, the creator of all, the goodness of God's creation, God's special

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The Religion Curriculum P-12 involves four strands: Sacred Texts, Beliefs, Church and Christian Life. These strands are interrelated and are taught in an integrated way, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. In Prep, students learn about some Old Testament and New Testament stories that tell of a God of love, the creator of all, the goodness of God's creation, God's special relationship with all of creation and God's plan that people help each other to live safely and happily together, for the good of all. Students listen to, read and view stories of and about Jesus in the Gospels that tell of Jesus' life as a Jew, his mother Mary, his friends and family; of Jesus praying and teaching others to pray; of his teachings about love, compassion and forgiveness that challenged people about the way they were living; and of his suffering, death and . They learn that Christians believe God created people with the freedom to choose between good and bad, right and wrong. They explore examples of times, from familiar texts and their personal experience, when people make these choices. Students understand that prayer helps believers follow the teachings of Jesus; to live according to God's plan. They learn about ways in which believers pray, either alone or with others, including the Sign of the Cross and Amen. They observe ways in which believers pray together during special celebrations and rituals that mark important times in the life of believers and in the Church year. They learn about the Church building as a sacred place for believers and the Bible as a sacred book for believers.

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Prep Year Content Descriptions

Sacred Texts

Christians the Bible as a sacred book in many ways, including proclamation in prayer celebrations and meditative reflection in personal prayer.

  • Use and display the Bible respectfully
  • Listen with respect as is proclaimed in prayerful settings.


Familiarity with characters, events and messages from some key Old Testament stories, including Joseph (Genesis 37:1-36, 39:1-6, 41:15-44, 41:53-57, 42-46) and David (1 Samuel 17:1-49), is a means of connecting and real life.

  • Listen and respond to Old Testament stories Share feelings and thoughts about the events, characters and messages in some familiar Old Testament stories
  • Make links between some familiar stories and their own experiences by sharing characters, events and messages that may be similar to or different from their own experiences.

Christians the Bible as a sacred book in many ways, including proclamation in prayer celebrations and meditative reflection in personal prayer.

  • Use and display the Bible reverently
  • Listen with reverence as is proclaimed in prayerful settings.


The Gospels tell the good news of Jesus. Familiarity with characters, events and messages from some key New Testament stories, including the birth of Jesus (Luke 2:1-7; Matthew 1:18-25), is a means of connecting and real life.

  • Listen and respond to stories of and about Jesus in the Gospels
  • Share feelings and thoughts about the events, characters and messages in some familiar New Testament stories
  • Make links between some familiar stories and their own experiences by sharing characters, events and messages that may be similar to or different from their own experiences.

Christian Spiritual Writings and

The writer of the first creation story in the Old Testament (Genesis 1:1-2:4a) repeatedly uses the statement “And God saw that it was good” to emphasise God's special relationship with all of creation. Jesus's challenged people about the way they were living (e.g. The Greatest Commandment: “Love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul and all your mind and love your neighbour as yourself.” Matthew 22:37-39).

  • Share feelings and thoughts about the goodness of God's creation from their own experience
  • Make connections between some of Jesus' wise statements and how these are expressed in a range of stories (e.g. personal stories, stories of the school's founders, children's literature, film, art).

Beliefs
: God, Jesus the Christ, Spirit

There is one God, the source of truth and love, who is creator of all. God's presence is revealed in the goodness of creation.

  • Listen and respond to the two creation stories in Genesis (Genesis 1:1-2:4a and Genesis 2:4b-9; 15-25)
  • Make links between God and the natural world
  • Share their ideas about God and creation.


Christians believe that Jesus suffered, died and rose again.

  • Listen and respond to the Easter story in the Gospels, including Mark 16:1-8
  • Share feelings and thoughts about the events, characters and messages in the story.

World Religions

Jesus was a Jew. He lived in a Jewish family and Mary was his mother.

  • Recognise stories from the that tell about Jesus' life as a Jew, such as the presentation in the temple (Luke 2:22-24; Luke 2:39-40) and the finding in the temple (Luke 2: 41-52)
  • Investigate and report what Jewish families were like in the time of Jesus.

Church
Liturgy and Sacraments

The Church has important ways of praying together through celebrations and rituals, marking special times in the life of believers (e.g. Baptism, ) and in the Church year (the liturgical seasons).

  • Identify celebrations and rituals that mark special times in the life of the Church community (e.g. Baptism, Eucharist, Reconciliation, Christmas, Easter) and in the Church year (e.g. Lent, Holy Week, Easter, , Ordinary Time, Advent and Christmas)
  • Describe some ways in which members of the Church pray together during special celebrations and rituals (e.g. word, action, silence, music and symbol, patterns/repetition, special colours)
  • Make connections between Church rituals and special times in the lives of believers (e.g. Baptism and welcome; reconciliation and forgiveness).

People of God

The Church building is a sacred place. Believers gather in the Church to pray, to be together and to celebrate various rituals (e.g. Baptism, , Marriage).

  • Identify features of the Church building that mark it as a sacred place (e.g. religious art, artefacts, icons and symbols, sacred objects, special clothes, parish name, etiquette)
  • Describe some ways in which believers gather in the Church to pray, to be together and to celebrate various rituals.

Christian Life
Moral Formation

Jesus taught key messages about love, compassion and forgiveness, including the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:29-37). Jesus taught that love of God and others is the greatest commandment. Christians are called to follow the teachings of Jesus.

  • Share feelings and thoughts about some of Jesus' key messages about love, compassion and forgiveness
  • Identify connections between Jesus' key messages about love, compassion and forgiveness and their personal experience.


According to Christian teaching, God created people as rational beings with the freedom to choose. Choices between good and bad, right and wrong involve the whole person - emotions, feelings and reasoning.

  • Identify examples from scriptural texts, including the Ten Lepers (Luke 17:11-18), where people have the freedom to choose between good and bad, right and wrong
  • Explore the emotions, feelings and reasoning involved when people make choices between good and bad, right and wrong and make connections with their personal experiences.

Mission and Justice

God's plan is that people help each other to live safely and happily together. Societal laws are intended to be for the good of all.

  • Identify connections between God's plan for people to live safely and happily, as illustrated by Jesus' teaching (e.g. The Golden Rule, Matthew 7:12//Luke 6:31), and their personal experience (e.g. at school, home, community)
  • Explore their feelings and thoughts about societal laws (e.g. classroom, playground, family, safety) being intended for the good of all, rather than to meet individual wants and needs.

Prayer and Spirituality

Jesus prayed regularly and taught others how to pray. Prayer involves both talking and listening to God, either alone or with others. Believers pray with the help of word, music, action, silence, images, symbols and nature.

  • Identify some occasions when believers pray alone (personal prayer) and pray with others (communal prayer)
  • Communicate an understanding of the language, gestures, purpose and context of the Sign of the Cross and Amen
  • Listen and respond to stories in the Gospels of Jesus praying and teaching others to pray,including teaching his (Luke 11:1-4)
  • Recognise elements that help believers pray
  • Participate with respect in a variety of prayer experiences (e.g. prayer circles, school prayer, thank you prayers).


Meditative prayer uses silence and stillness to assist believers to listen and talk to God. There is a range of practices (including being silent and still, and lighting a candle) that helps believers prepare the body and the mind for meditative prayer and engage in the 'work of meditation'.

  • Participate respectfully in meditative prayer
  • Identify and use practices that assist them to prepare for and engage in meditative prayer.

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Prep Year Achievement Standard

By the end of Prep, students communicate their ideas, feelings and thoughts about God, the goodness of God’s creation and God’s plan that people help each other to live safely and happily together for the good of all. They identify connections between some Old Testament stories and their personal experience including the experience of the goodness of creation. Students listen and respond to stories of and about Jesus in the Gospels that tell of Jesus’ life as a Jew; his mother Mary, his family and friends; of Jesus praying and teaching others to pray; and of his suffering, death and resurrection. Students recognise Jesus’ teachings about love, compassion and forgiveness that challenged people about the way they were living. They relate examples of people having the freedom to choose between good and bad, right and wrong.
Students understand that prayer helps believers to follow the teachings of Jesus to live according to God’s plan. They recognise ways in which believers pray either alone or with others, using word, music, action, silence, images, symbols and nature. They participate with respect in a variety of these prayer experiences including the Sign of the Cross, and Amen and meditative prayer practices especially silence and stillness and lighting a candle. They describe ways in which believers pray together during special celebrations and rituals that mark important times in the life of believers and in the Church Year.

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Prep Year Learning Bytes

 

Year 1  

Year 1 Description

The Religion Curriculum P-12 involves four strands: Sacred Texts, Beliefs, Church and Christian Life. These strands are interrelated and are taught in an integrated way, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. In Year 1, students explore the Christian teaching that all people are created in God's own image, with dignity and natural rights. They learn about living in accordanc

Read full description ›

The Religion Curriculum P-12 involves four strands: Sacred Texts, Beliefs, Church and Christian Life. These strands are interrelated and are taught in an integrated way, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. In Year 1, students explore the Christian teaching that all people are created in God's own image, with dignity and natural rights. They learn about living in accordance with God's plan for all creation: living safely and happily in community and in loving relationship with God, with a responsibility to care for all creation and using God's gift of freedom to make choices responsibly. They engage with a variety of Old Testament texts to learn about God's presence in the lives of individuals and communities and make connections to their own experiences. They explore the words, actions and symbols used in the Sacraments of Baptism and to communicate God's presence and action. They learn about the different roles in the local parish community. Students learn about the nature of Jesus' mission and ministry. They explore aspects of Jewish daily life at the time of Jesus. They listen to, view and read accounts from different Gospels of key events, places and characters in the life of Jesus and explore similarities and differences in these accounts. They explore the many ways in which Mary, Mother of Jesus, is honoured by Christians past and present and develop their understanding of the Hail Mary, a Catholic prayer honouring Mary. Students understand that prayer was an important part of Jesus' life and is important in the lives of believers. They continue to learn about ways in which believers pray, either alone or with others.

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Year 1 Content Descriptions

Sacred Texts

For Christians, the Bible is a sacred book. The describes how the people of Israel have reflected on God's presence in their lives.

  • Make connections between the lives of people in stories, including Moses (Exodus 3:8-17), and the ways in which God was active in their lives.

The Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John provide particular insights into the life and teaching of Jesus. 

  • Identify key events, places and  characters in the life of Jesus as revealed in Gospel passages Identify similarities and differences between different Gospel accounts of key events, characters and teachings in the life of Jesus (e.g. birth, death, Jesus' family, Jesus' followers, meal stories, ).

Christian Spiritual Writings and

The of some Old Testament stories (e.g. Moses, Abraham, Noah, Joseph, Ruth, Jeremiah) helps people understand God's presence in the lives of individuals and communities.

  • Make connections between important messages about God's presence in the lives of individuals and communities in some stories and their own experiences.

Beliefs
: God, Jesus the Christ, Spirit

Jesus called people, including 'the twelve', to share in his mission and ministry.

  • Identify the nature of Jesus' mission and ministry (e.g. healing, teaching, forgiving)  Name key people in Gospel passages, including 'the twelve', whom Jesus called to share in his mission and ministry.

Human Existence

God created human beings in God's own image, in order to form a loving relationship with them. God's plan is that people help each other to live safely and happily in community.

  • Discuss ideas about God (including creator, forgiving, compassionate, caring, loving, listening)
  • Identify and share the gifts God has given
  • Make a connection between their ideas of God (e.g. God is loving) and the way people live safely and happily in community (e.g. I/we can show love when I/we...).

World Religions

Jesus participated in the life of the Jewish community.

  • Explore and record some aspects of Jewish daily life at the time of Jesus (including meal times, leisure times, observing the Sabbath, praying, food laws).

Church
Liturgy and Sacraments

Sacraments are sacred actions of the Church through which God is present. In the Sacraments of Baptism and , words, actions and symbols are used to communicate God's presence and action.

  • Identify words, actions and symbols used in the Sacrament of Baptism to communicate God's presence and action (e.g. use of water, sign of the cross, anointing with oil, white garment, Baptismal promises, candle)
  • Identify words, actions and symbols used in the Sacrament of to communicate God's presence and action (e.g. bread, wine, water, priest community gathered, table fellowship, the Word, sign of peace, sending forth).

People of God

Within a local parish community there are many different roles (e.g. priest, parishioner, liturgical ministries such as musicians and altar servers; parish groups such as family groups and prayer groups; parish such as St Vincent de Paul and youth worker).

  • Compare the different roles that people have in the local parish community.

Christian Life
Moral Formation

Christians believe God is creator and sustainer of life and all people have a responsibility to care for creation. Morality is about living in accordance with God's plan for creation. God's gift of the freedom to make choices is to be used responsibly.

  • Recognise literal and inferred meaning in sacred stories about creation, including the second creation story (Genesis 2: 4b-8, 15-23) and Noah: a story of re-creation (Genesis 6:13-9:1)
  • Make connections with personal experience when exploring Christian teaching about freedom to choose and how to use this freedom responsibly.

Mission and Justice

Based in , the Church teaches that all people are created in the image of God. The Church teaches that all people have dignity and natural rights and deserve respect, regardless of their religious, social or ethnic background.

  • Communicate a personal response to the Church teaching that all people are created in the image of God.Make connections with personal experience when exploring Christian teaching about the dignity and natural rights of all people, regardless of their religious, social or ethnic background.

Prayer and Spirituality

Jesus prayed regularly and taught others how to pray. Prayer involves talking and listening to God, either alone or gathered as community. Believers pray with the help of word, music, action, silence, images, symbols and nature. Prayer in the Christian tradition, including Marian prayer, nurtures the spiritual life of believers.

  • Describe and explain the significance of some occasions when believers gather as community to pray (e.g. school feast day, Baptism, Sunday Mass, funerals, weddings, school prayer assemblies and liturgical celebrations)
  • Participate with respect in a variety of personal and communal prayer experiences, including Grace and Marian prayer.


Mary, Mother of Jesus, has been honoured in many ways by Christians both past and present (e.g. prayer, images, music). The Hail Mary is a Catholic prayer, using words of (Luke 1:26-28; Luke 1:39-42) and developed over a long period of time.

  • Identify ways believers past and present have honoured Mary
  • Communicate an understanding of the language, purpose and context of the Hail Mary.


Meditative prayer uses silence and stillness to assist believers to listen and talk to God. There is a range of practices (including closing eyes, and praying with beads and music) that helps believers prepare the body and the mind for meditative prayer and engage in the 'work of meditation'.

  • Participate respectfully in meditative prayer
  • Identify and use practices and spiritual exercises that assist them to prepare for and engage in meditative prayer.

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Year 1 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 1, students make connections to their personal experience when explaining ways of living in accordance with God’s plan for creation. They identify how people live safely and happily in community and in loving relationship with God. They explain how to respect the dignity and natural rights of all people, to care for all creation by responsibly using God’s gift of freedom to make choices. Students relate stories from some Old Testament texts that describe God’s presence and action in the lives of individuals and communities. They identify words, actions and symbols used in the Sacraments of Baptism and Eucharist to communicate God’s presence and action.
Students identify the nature of Jesus’ mission and ministry, as well as some similarities and differences between Gospel accounts of significant events, places and characters in the life of Jesus. They describe some aspects of Jewish daily life at the time of Jesus. They recognise some ways in which believers past and present honour Mary, Mother of Jesus, including praying the Hail Mary. Students recognise the significance of prayer in Jesus’ life and in the lives of believers and participate with respect in a variety of personal and communal prayer experiences including Grace and the Hail Mary and meditative prayer practices especially closing eyes, praying with beads and music.

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Year 1 Learning Bytes

 

Year 2  

Year 2 Description

The Religion Curriculum P-12 involves four strands: Sacred Texts, Beliefs, Church and Christian Life. These strands are interrelated and are taught in an integrated way, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. In Year 2, students learn about aspects of God's nature and God's relationship with people, as they engage with a variety of New Testament texts depicting the teachings

Read full description ›

The Religion Curriculum P-12 involves four strands: Sacred Texts, Beliefs, Church and Christian Life. These strands are interrelated and are taught in an integrated way, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. In Year 2, students learn about aspects of God's nature and God's relationship with people, as they engage with a variety of New Testament texts depicting the teachings and actions of Jesus and Old Testament texts that describe God's relationship with the Jewish people. They explore contextual information about the first century Mediterranean world, to better appreciate the life and times of Jesus. They learn about Jesus' mission and ministry and explore ways in which Jesus' teachings and actions continue to guide the life of the Church community today. They explore, recognise and appreciate the history of a parish community as it is revealed in many ways. Students learn about the sacredness of all creation, especially human life; the call to be co-creators and stewards of God's creation; and the responsibility to pursue peace and justice out of respect for human life and all creation. They develop their understanding of the loving relationship God unconditionally offers to people; and their understanding of , as evident in the free choices that harm the individual and their loving relationships with God, with others and with all creation. They explore ways in which believers seek to heal these relationships through reconciliation and prayer. They investigate ways in which believers celebrate reconciliation with God and with others in the Sacrament of Penance. Students examine ways in which prayer and the wisdom of the saints help believers to nurture their loving relationships with God, with others and with all creation. They develop their understanding of prayer in the Christian tradition through an exploration of prayer for forgiveness (acts of contrition and Penitential Act) and meditative prayer.

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Year 2 Content Descriptions

Sacred Texts

The Bible is a library of books. It is made up of two parts: the Old Testament and the .

  • Identify some features of text organisation, namely the titles 'Old Testament' and '' and the Table of Contents, to locate some of the books containing familiar Bible stories.


The Church teaches that the Bible is an inspired account of God's self-revelation. The describes God's relationship with the Jewish people. The Abraham and Sarah story is one example of how God relates with people (e.g. promise to Abraham and Sarah, Genesis 17:1-8; 15-19, 21-22).

  • Identify people, places, events and things in some Old Testament stories
  • Identify behaviours and actions in some Old Testament stories that reveal aspects of God's nature (e.g. loving, just, relational, forgiving)
  • Share and compare ideas and opinions with others about God's relationship with people in stories.

The consists of 27 books that proclaim the life and teaching of Jesus and the early Christian Church.

  • Identify some features of text organisation, namely the titles 'Old Testament' and 'New Testament' and the Table of Contents to locate some of the books depicting the life and teaching of Jesus (Gospels) and the early Christian Church (e.g. Acts of the , the letters).


The life and teaching of Jesus is the primary source of God's self-revelation in the .

Identify some teachings and actions of Jesus that reveal aspects of God's nature (e.g. father, loving, just, forgiving, welcoming, inclusive).


Knowledge of the historical, cultural and geographical context of the first century Mediterranean world assists the reader of the Gospels to better appreciate the life and times of Jesus.

  • Gather and record information about the geographical, cultural and historical context of the first century Mediterranean world
  • Identify and place some of the key events and people of the first century Mediterranean world within a time sequence
  • Add contextual information (historical, geographical and/or cultural) about the first century Mediterranean world to familiar Gospel stories.

Christian Spiritual Writings and

The of the saints (e.g. St Francis of Assisi, St Clare of Assisi, St Therese of Lisieux, St Kevin of Glendalough) helps people understand about being co-creators and stewards of creation; the sacredness of all creation, especially human life; and forgiveness and reconciliation.

Create print, visual or audio texts that draw on their own experiences, their imagination and information they have learnt from the wisdom of the saints about being co-creators and stewards of creation; the sacredness of all creation, especially human life; and forgiveness and reconciliation.

Beliefs
: God, Jesus the Christ, Spirit

Jesus lived a truly human life. His mission and ministry was to preach and bring about the of God, including through his teaching, healing, and forgiving.

  • Identify the purpose and nature of Jesus' mission and ministry as depicted in some Gospel stories.Describe the effect of Jesus' mission and ministry on the lives of key characters in some Gospel stories.

Human Existence

Human beings are called to be co-creators and stewards of God's creation.

  • Identify ways in which human beings are called to be co-creators and stewards of creation (e.g. caring for the environment, responsible use of natural resources)
  • Promote a specific action of caring for God's creation.

World Religions

The Jewish people are a people. Their relationship with God is expressed in their daily lives. 

  • Describe the Jewish understanding of covenant as agreement between God and the Jewish people
  • Record and report examples of how the is lived in the daily lives of Jewish people today.

Church
Liturgy and Sacraments

Forgiveness involves reconciliation with God and each other and restores broken relationships. In the Sacrament of Penance, believers celebrate reconciliation with God and each other. The Sacrament of Penance continues Jesus' healing ministry in the life of the community.

  • Identify and analyse scenarios from the Gospels and from life experience that involve restoring broken relationships (reconciliation)
  • Recognise and record ways in which believers celebrate reconciliation with God and with each other in the Sacrament of Penance
  • Make connections between Jesus' healing ministry and the Church's healing ministry in the Sacrament of Penance.

People of God

The Church community draws from the teachings and actions of Jesus (e.g. actions of Jesus: praying, forgiving and helping people in need; teachings of Jesus: love, justice and peace) to guide the way they live. 

  • Identify key teachings and actions from Jesus' life that guide the life of the Church community
  • Make connections between the ways members of the Church community live today and some teachings and actions of Jesus.

Church History

Each parish community has its own past, which is revealed in many ways (for example in its pastors and people, buildings, sites or parts of the natural environment).

  • Pose questions about aspects of the past of a parish community (e.g. about the patron saint of the parish, a significant person, site, building or part of the natural environment)
  • Sequence some key events in the past of a parish community (e.g. events related to the patron saint of the parish, a significant person, site, building or part of the natural environment)
  • Develop a narrative about aspects of the past of a parish community.

Christian Life
Moral Formation

Humans are called to acknowledge the sacredness of God and all creation, especially human life. The world is God's gift to all generations; therefore care for all creation (stewardship) is a moral duty.

  • Identify some inferred meanings (e.g. God created; all creation is sacred; humans are stewards of creation) of Judeo-Christian creation stories, including Genesis 1:1-2:4a; Genesis 2:4b-25 and Genesis 9:8-17)
  • Compare and contrast their own actions and behaviours with the moral duty of caring for all creation as taught in the Judeo-Christian creation stories.


The loving relationship God offers to people is unconditional. Sin is made evident in the free choices that harm the individual and their loving relationships with God, with others and with all creation. Reconciliation involves admission of , saying sorry, asking for God's help to change and seeking to heal relationships. There is no limit to God's mercy and forgiveness.

  • Identify behaviours and actions in some Scriptural texts, including Jesus teaches about forgiving others (Luke 17:3-4) and the Forgiving Father (Luke 15:11-31), that reveal aspects of God's nature (e.g. loving, just, relational, forgiving, welcoming, merciful)
  • Identify evidence of sin and the consequences of sin, using scenarios from the Gospels and/or from life experiences
  • Identify and analyse scenarios from the Gospels and/or from life experiences that illustrate the four elements of reconciliation (admit , say sorry, ask for God's help to change and seek to heal relationships).

Mission and Justice

God's plan is that people respect all life, especially human life. All people have a responsibility to pursue peace and justice out of respect for human life and all creation.

  • Identify and express ideas about scriptural texts that illustrate peaceful and just actions or relationships
  • Make connections between scriptural texts about respecting human life and all creation and their own life experiences.

Prayer and Spirituality

Prayer for forgiveness requires admission of , saying sorry, asking God's help to change and seeking to heal one's loving relationships with God, with others and with all creation.

  • Communicate an understanding of the language, purpose, gestures and context of prayers for forgiveness including acts of contrition and Penitential Act (A, B, C)
  • Participate with respect in a variety of personal and communal prayer experiences, including prayer for forgiveness.


Meditative prayer uses silence and stillness to assist believers to listen and talk to God. There is a range of practices (including centred breathing and attending to posture) that helps believers prepare the body and the mind for meditative prayer and engage in the 'work of meditation'.

  • Participate respectfully in meditative prayer
  • Identify and use practices and spiritual exercises that assist in preparing and engaging in meditative prayer.

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Year 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students identify aspects of God’s nature as revealed in the Bible. They discuss ideas about God’s relationship with the Jewish people as described in some Old Testament stories. They analyse teachings and actions of Jesus depicted in New Testament texts that reveal aspects of God’s nature. Students make connections between Jesus’ teachings and actions and the way members of the Church community live today. They pose questions about the life and times of Jesus and use sources provided to answer these questions. They make connections between Jesus’ healing ministry and the Church community’s celebration of the Sacrament of Penance.
Students recognise the sacredness of God and all creation including human life. They identify ways in which humans respond to the call to be co-creators and stewards of God’s creation. Drawing on their own experiences, they suggest ways to pursue peace and justice out of respect for human life and all creation. Students recognise ways in which believers nurture their relationship with God, with others and with all of creation. They recognise choices that harm an individual and their loving relationships with God, others and all creation. They explain ways in which believers seek to heal these relationships through reconciliation. They recognise that prayer and the wisdom of the saints help the believer to nurture their relationship with God, others and all creation. They participate with respect in a variety of personal and communal prayer experiences especially prayers for forgiveness including acts of contrition and Penitential Act. They participate with respect in a variety of meditative prayer practices including centred breathing and attending to posture.

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Year 2 Learning Bytes

 

Year 3  

Year 3 Description

The Religion Curriculum P-12 involves four strands: Sacred Texts, Beliefs, Church and Christian Life. These strands are interrelated and are taught in an integrated way; and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. In Year 3, students develop their understanding of God's relationship with people as individuals and as community, and the presence and action of God in daily life expe

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The Religion Curriculum P-12 involves four strands: Sacred Texts, Beliefs, Church and Christian Life. These strands are interrelated and are taught in an integrated way; and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. In Year 3, students develop their understanding of God's relationship with people as individuals and as community, and the presence and action of God in daily life experiences, as they engage with a variety of texts (including key stories from the Torah, images of God used in Old Testament texts, and the wisdom of prayers attributed to the saints). They develop an appreciation of the order and harmony of creation. They learn about the cultural contexts in which the Gospels were written and the text types used in the New Testament to develop their understanding of the life and teaching of Jesus and the Christian belief that Jesus is the Messiah. Students develop an appreciation of the Scriptures as a basis for Christian moral living, including respect for basic human rights and acknowledgement of responsibilities, in particular to the poor and disadvantaged. They develop an appreciation of the collaboration of clergy, religious and laity as they learn about significant features of a parish and diocese, past and present. They learn about the significance of the Sacraments of Initiation (Baptism, Confirmation, Eucharist) for the Church community. They investigate prayers of thanksgiving and prayers of praise, including and doxologies, to facilitate an appreciation of the significance of these forms of prayer for Christians.

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Year 3 Content Descriptions

Sacred Texts

Old Testament scriptures, including Isaiah 49:15- 16, use many different images to portray God (e.g. fire, rain, potter, mother, refuge, sanctuary, lover). The are used in prayer, especially in praise of and thanksgiving to God.

  • Examine the textual features of Old Testament texts (e.g. language, form, use of images, words and phrases in the )
  • Speculate on the human author's reasons for choosing a particular image to portray God
  • Communicate personal reactions to various images used to portray God in some Old Testament texts.

A knowledge of the cultural contexts of the Gospels assists the reader to better understand the life and teaching of Jesus.

  • Retrieve contextual information from written and digital texts to identify some aspects of the cultural contexts in which the Gospels were written
  • Begin to analyse gospel stories by drawing on a growing knowledge of the context in which the story was written in order to communicate thinking and understandings about the life and teaching of Jesus.


The New Testament is a collection of text types (e.g. Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, letters, other writings) which differ, depending on the intention and context of the human author. The intention of the human author is important in determining the nature of the truth revealed in the text (e.g. historical truth, factual truth, religious truth).

  • Become familiar with typical structural stages and language features of various types of text in the New Testament (e.g. narratives, letters, )
  • Speculate on the human author's reasons for using particular types of text.

Christian Spiritual Writings and

The of prayers attributed to the saints (e.g. The Deer's Cry/Breastplate of St Patrick) helps one understand God's relationship with people as individuals and as community.

  • Identify the effect on listeners, viewers or readers of the words and images used in some spiritual writings of the saints (e.g. The Deer's Cry/ Breastplate of St Patrick) to express important messages about God's relationship with people.

Beliefs
: God, Jesus the Christ, Spirit

Christians believe that Jesus is the and this is revealed through his presence and in his words, deeds and encounters with others.

  • Identify some Scriptural texts in which Jesus is called 'Messiah', including the birth of Jesus the Messiah (Matthew 1:17-2:12)
  • Communicate an understanding of the term 'Messiah' from .

Human Existence

Christians believe that order and harmony arise from the diversity and interdependence of creation.

  • Identify the diversity of God's created world
  • Explore some of the relationships that exist in the created world (e.g. sun and moon)
  • Communicate an understanding of order and harmony in God's creation.

World Religions

The Jewish people have a special relationship with God. This relationship is revealed through the stories, people and events recorded in the , or written law.

  • Identify stories, people and events recorded in the five books of the Torah, including God's promise to Jacob (Genesis 28:10-22)
  • Describe God's relationship with the Israelites as revealed in key stories from the .

Church
Liturgy and Sacraments

Through the Sacraments of Initiation (Baptism, Confirmation and Eucharist), people become members of the Body of Christ, the Church community, and receive strength for the journey of life. Baptism is the first of the Sacraments of Initiation. In the Sacrament of Confirmation, words, actions and symbols are used to communicate God's presence and action. completes Christian initiation and provides nourishment for the spiritual life of believers.

  • Make connections between personal experiences of initiation (e.g. new class, new school, new team) and the experience of believers becoming members of the Church through the Sacraments of Initiation
  • Identify words, actions and symbols used in the Sacrament of Confirmation to communicate God's presence and action (e.g. laying on of hands, sealing with oil, sign of peace, renewal of Baptismal promises, presence of the sponsor, discipleship, Holy Spirit).

People of God

A diocese is a particular community of parishes usually within a defined geographical boundary under the leadership of the bishop.

  • Discuss what Catholics mean when they talk about a 'diocese'
  • Identify some key features of the local diocese/archdiocese (e.g. its location; the names of key buildings, bishop/archbishop, one or more parishes that belong to the diocese/archdiocese)
  • Make connections between the role of the bishop and some of his important duties (e.g. as a teacher and a leader, the bishop writes letters/communicates with people in the diocese to teach them about special events; as a priest, the bishop celebrates Mass; as a leader of the diocese, he visits parishes).

Church History

Each parish is an important part of a diocese. An understanding of the history of a parish assists in exploring the history of the diocese to which it belongs. Part of this history is the story of the collaboration of the clergy, religious and laity so that people can hear the Gospel and know Jesus.

  • Pose a range of questions about the history of a parish and diocese
  • Identify and sequence people and events of historical significance in the story of a parish and diocese
  • Identify and explain an important example of change and of continuity in the story of a parish and diocese (e.g. spirituality of local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; ways of celebrating; liturgical space; roles in the liturgy, parish/diocesan groups)
  • Develop an historical text (e.g. narrative) about a person or event of historical significance in the story of a parish and diocese, using terms denoting time.

Christian Life
Moral Formation

The Scriptures provide a foundation for moral living, specifically the Decalogue, Beatitudes and the fruits of the Spirit. The Decalogue (Ten Commandments) is a guide for making moral decisions. Jesus' teaching in the provides a basis for Christian morality. It does not abolish the Decalogue but fulfils it, making clearer what is required of one who loves God. The fruits of the Spirit enable Christians to live a moral life.

  • Identify the audience and purpose of the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:3-11; Luke 6:20-26)
  • Identify the connection between The Decalogue (Ten Commandments) and Jesus' teaching in the Beatitudes
  • Draw connections between scriptural foundations for moral living, specifically the Decalogue, and the fruits of the Spirit, and personal experience.

Mission and Justice

Jesus' great commandment requires Christians to respect basic human rights and acknowledge responsibilities. Concern for the poor and disadvantaged is a key message in (including Luke 4:16-21) and church teaching.

  • Make connections between the concern for the poor and disadvantaged, found in and Church teaching, and the responsibility of Christians.