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  • German Context Statement
  • German Years 7–10 (Year 7 Entry) Sequence
  • Years F–10 Sequence
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Foundation to Year 2  

Foundation to Year 2 Band Description

The nature of the learners Children enter the early years of schooling with established oracy skills in one or more languages and varying degrees of early literacy capability. For young students, learning typically focuses on their immediate world of family, home, school, friends and neighbourhood. They are learning how to socialise with new people, sh

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The nature of the learners

Children enter the early years of schooling with established oracy skills in one or more languages and varying degrees of early literacy capability. For young students, learning typically focuses on their immediate world of family, home, school, friends and neighbourhood. They are learning how to socialise with new people, share with others and participate in structured routines and activities at school. Typically they have little to no experience of German language and culture.

German language learning and use

At this stage, games, music, movement, familiar routines, and imaginative activities such as role-plays provide essential scaffolding and relevant contexts for language development. Learners engage with the sounds, shapes and patterns of German through activities such as rhymes, songs, clapping and action games. They identify and use simple formulaic expressions, one- or two-word responses to prompts and cues, and non-verbal German communication strategies. They learn to write by tracing and copying, forming letters legibly. They learn to write words and simple sentences independently using modelled language, for example, by matching pictures with single words, labels or captions.

Contexts of interaction

The primary context of interaction is the language classroom, as learners interact with the teacher and with one another. Their use of German relates primarily to classroom routines and activities, draws on curiosity about the world around them, and engages their interest in play, movement and games.

Texts and resources

Learners engage with a variety of spoken, written and digital texts. They listen and respond to teacher talk, share ideas, and join in stories, songs, play and simple conversations. Physical, virtual and digital resources provide access to additional German language and cultural interactions, connecting learners’ social worlds with those of their peers in other German-speaking contexts.

Features of German language use

Learners become familiar with the sounds and rhythms of German, approximating the pronunciation and phrasing of single words and short phrases, including distinctive sounds such as ch, r, th, u and z, and diphthongs such as au, ei, eu and ie. They use simple basic sentence structures and familiar vocabulary for everyday functions such as greetings, asking and answering questions, responding to instructions, and participating in games, performances and simple shared tasks. They learn to write single words and simple phrases, noticing the use of the Eszett and how an Umlaut changes the sound of vowels. They notice similarities and differences between German and English. They use modelled language to produce their own short texts and to interact. They begin to notice that language behaves differently in different situations and that German speakers communicate in some ways that are different from their own. As they communicate about differences and similarities, they begin to understand that they are part of a connected world. This introduction to the reflective dimension of intercultural language learning begins to develop an understanding of culture.

Level of support

Support is provided through visual and tactile materials such as pictures, realia, objects and charts, and through the use of gesture and movement. The teacher provides prompts, cues, and opportunities for repetition and recycling to help learners identify and remember frequently used words and simple phrases. Learners rely on modelled language, scaffolded tasks, feedback and encouragement to build their language capability.

The role of English

Learners are encouraged to use German whenever possible, particularly when engaging in classroom interactions and routines. The teacher uses German as much as possible for instruction. English is used for explanation and discussion, allowing learners to communicate about differences and similarities they notice between German and their own language(s), to ask questions about language and culture, and to consider their experience of learning German.

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Foundation to Year 2 Content Descriptions

Communicating
Socialising

Interact and socialise with peers and teacher to exchange greetings and information about self and family, and express likes and dislikes

[Key concepts: self, family; Key processes: interacting, greeting, thanking]


Participate in guided group activities using simple repetitivein songs, rhymes, games and transactions

[Key concepts: play, performance, action learning; Key processes: participating, taking turns]


Recognise and respond to instructions and questions about activities, games and classroom routines, and make polite requests

[Key concepts: roles, routines; Key processes: following instructions, participating, listening]

Informing

Identify key words and information in simple shared texts related to personal worlds

[Key concepts: literacy, text; Key processes: locating, matching, ordering]


Convey factual information about self, family and possessions through pictures, labels, captions and short descriptions, using familiar words and modelled language

[Key concepts: identity, belonging; Key processes: naming, labelling, describing]

Creating

Engage with a range of imaginative texts through action, dance, singing, drawing, shared reading and collaborative retelling

[Key concepts: imagination, performance, setting; Key processes: participating, responding]


Express ideas and experiences in a variety of ways using familiar words and modelled language, such as through imaginative role-play, mime, drawing, oral discussion or scaffolded writing activities

[Key concepts: role-play, discussion, imagination; Key processes: performing, expressing]

Translating

Share with peers and family what they know in German, identifying different words and expressions, moving between languages depending on the audience

[Key concepts: representation, difference; Key processes: noticing, comparing]


print orsuch as labels, posters, word banks and wall charts for the immediate learning environment in both German and English

[Key concepts: vocabulary, representation; Key processes: sorting, matching, noticing]

Reflecting

Notice similarities and differences when using German compared to own language, such as how it feels, sounds and looks, and involves behaviours as well as words

[Key concepts: language, culture, difference; Key processes: noticing, comparing, observing]


Express aspects of self, such as family, school/class, age and language(s), noticing how these are part of one’s sense of identity

[Key concepts: self, identity; Key processes: expressing, describing, noticing]

Understanding
Systems of language

Recognise and reproduce the sounds and rhythms of spoken German, including distinctive sounds

[Key concepts: pronunciation, intonation; Key processes: listening, imitating, recognising]


Understand some first elements of German grammar, such as simpleforms, definite articles and pronouns, to identify and describe people and objects in the family and school domains

[Key concepts: word order, connections, gender; Key processes: noticing patterns, making connections, selecting]


Understand thatis organised as ‘texts’, which take different forms and use different structures and features to achieve their purposes

[Key concepts: structure, form; Key processes: noticing, recognising, comparing]

Language variation and change

Recognise that in German, as in English and other languages, there are different ways of greeting and interacting with people

[Key concepts: register,conventions, social practice; Key processes: noticing, comparing]


Recognise that Australia has speakers of many different languages, including German, and that German and English borrow words and expressions from each other

[Key concepts: multilingualism, culture, community; Key processes: observing, exploring, recognising]

Role of language and culture

Notice that the languages people use relate to who they are and where and how they live

[Key concepts: place, culture; Key processes: noticing, exploring]

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Foundation to Year 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students interact with teachers and peers through action-related talk and play. They introduce themselves, exchange greetings and farewells, for example, Ich heiße … Auf Wiedersehen! and express likes and dislikes. When interacting, they use short formulaic expressions, for example, Morgen! Danke! Alles Gute zum Geburtstag! Frohe Weihnachten! Guten Appetit! and make simple statements, such as Das ist … Ich wohne in … Ich mag … They use repetitive language and respond to simple instructions when participating in games, shared activities and classroom routines. They use visual, non-verbal and contextual cues such as intonation, gestures and facial expressions to help make meaning, and reproduce some distinctive sounds and rhythms of spoken German, including ch, u, r and z . Students identify specific words and information, such as names of people, places or objects, in simple shared texts related to personal worlds. They convey factual information about self, family and possessions at word and simple sentence level. They respond to and create simple spoken and written texts, using modelled examples and formulaic language. They use short phrases and simple sentences to identify and describe people and objects in the family and school domains such as der Lehrer, eine Freundin, Das ist mein Stift , including some pronouns, for example, ich, du, er, sie, es, wir and possessive adjectives, mein/e, dein/e . They use nein and nicht for negation, and verb forms bin, bist and ist, with an adjective. Students explain the meaning and use of different German words and expressions, and create texts in German and English for their immediate learning environment. They identify similarities and differences between German and their own language(s) and culture(s), noticing that using a language involves behaviours as well as words.

Students identify ways that German sounds different to English but recognise that it uses the same alphabet. They identify some words that are written the same in both German and English but pronounced differently. They identify features of different types of texts. They give examples of words that German and English borrow from each other and from other languages, and identify different ways of greeting and interacting with people. They make connections between the languages people use and who they are and where they live. 

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Years 3 and 4  

Years 3 and 4 Band Description

The nature of the learners At this level, children are developing awareness of their social world and membership of various groups, including that of the German class. They have developed initial literacy in English, and this assists to some degree in learning German, such as writing in the Roman alphabet. They benefit from varied, activity-based learn

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The nature of the learners

At this level, children are developing awareness of their social world and membership of various groups, including that of the German class. They have developed initial literacy in English, and this assists to some degree in learning German, such as writing in the Roman alphabet. They benefit from varied, activity-based learning that builds on their interests and capabilities and makes connections with other areas of learning.

German language learning and use

The development of oral proficiency at this stage continues to rely on rich language input in different modes and from different sources. Learners build active listening and comprehension skills, using contextual, grammatical, phonic and non-verbal cues. Language is authentic with some modification, involving familiar vocabulary and simple structures. The balance between listening and speaking gradually shifts as learners are supported to use the language themselves in familiar contexts and situations, exchanging simple ideas and information, and participating in predictable activities and interactions, shared tasks, performance and play. They continue to build vocabulary that can be adapted for different purposes, and to use simple grammatical forms with some accuracy to communicate in familiar contexts.

A balance between language knowledge and language use is established by integrating focused attention to grammar, vocabulary building, pronunciation, and non-verbal and cultural dimensions of language use with opportunities for purposeful communication.

Contexts of interaction

The contexts in which learners interact in learning and using German are primarily local – the classroom, school, home and community – with some access to wider communities of German speakers through audiovisual and digital technologies.

Texts and resources

Learners develop literacy skills and textual knowledge through supported engagement with a range of spoken, written, visual and multimodal texts. Imaginative texts (such as picture books, fairy tales, puppet plays, songs and digital games) involve the expressive and cultural dimensions of language. Procedural, informative and descriptive texts (such as recipes, annotated posters, and family and class profiles) show how language is used for a variety of purposes.

Features of German language use

Learners notice features of German communication such as the use of gestures, facial expressions and intonation patterns. They become familiar with the idea of grammatical gender and become familiar with how to use singular and plural forms. Learning German contributes to the process of making sense of their personal/social worlds that characterises this stage of learners’ development. As they encounter German language and culture they make comparisons with their own language(s) and culture(s) and consider their own ways of communicating. This leads to exploring concepts of identity, commonality and difference, and to becoming aware of themselves as communicators in particular cultural contexts and communities.

Level of support

This stage of learning involves extensive support. Form-focused activities build learners’ grammatical knowledge and understanding, developing accuracy and control in spoken and written German. Teachers provide models and examples; introduce language, concepts and resources needed to manage and complete the task; make time for experimentation, drafting and redrafting; and provide support for self-monitoring and reflection.

The role of English

Learners use German for classroom routines and structured learning tasks, and for listening to and viewing German texts. English is used for class discussions, such as noticing and discussing aspects of German language and culture; for comparing English and German languages and cultures; and for reflecting on the process of learning another language.

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Years 3 and 4 Content Descriptions

Communicating
Socialising

Share information with peers and teacher about aspects of their personal worlds such as friends, home, favourite objects and activities

[Key concepts: friendship, identity; Key processes: describing, expressing]


Participate collaboratively in shared class experiences and transactions

[Key concepts: participation, creativity; Key processes: exchanging, negotiating, planning]


Participate in everyday classroom activities, responding to questions, instructions and requests, asking for clarification or assistance and making simple statements about own and others’ learning

[Key concepts: support, learning strategies; Key processes: requesting, clarifying, responding]

Informing

Obtain and process information from peers and texts related to personal, social and natural worlds

[Key concepts: community, family, friends; Key processes: reading, listening, selecting, organising]


Present information in modelled spoken and written texts relating to personal, social and natural worlds

[Key concepts: family, friends; Key processes: describing, presenting, collating]

Creating

Respond to imaginative print andin a variety of ways such as by acting out events, identifying favourite elements and making simple statements about characters

[Key concepts: character, events; Key processes: describing, retelling]


imaginative texts such as simple plays, poems and stories, using formulaic expressions and modelledas well as simple visual supports

[Key concepts: fantasy, entertainment, amusement; Key processes: performing, creating, presenting]

Translating

Compare aspects of German and English language, such as vocabulary, sounds and rhymes, and cultural information, and share with peers and family

[Key concepts: meaning, interconnection; Key processes: comparing, interpreting, explaining]


Produce texts such as signs, class word lists and picture dictionaries in both German and English for the classroom and school community

[Key concepts: vocabulary, translation; Key processes: labelling, matching, translating]

Reflecting

Notice and describe what looks or feels similar or different to ownandwhen interacting in German

[Key concepts: communication, difference, respect; Key processes: noticing, comparing, describing]


Describe their own experiences of learning and using German and explore their sense of identity, including elements such as family, cultural heritage and friends

[Key concepts: self, family, friends; Key processes: exploring, comparing, identifying]

Understanding
Systems of language

Experiment with theof vowel sounds, letter combinations andpatterns, and recognise and write high-frequency words and expressions in familiar contexts

[Key concepts: pronunciation, intonation, accents; Key processes: distinguishing sounds, recognising, practising]


Notice and apply elements of German grammar such as gender and singular/plural forms, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns and word order in simple spoken and written texts

[Key concepts: word order, connections, syntax, cases; Key processes: noticing patterns, making connections]


Identify the purposes of familiar personal, informative and imaginative texts such as maps, calendars and fairy tales, and explain how particular features of such texts help to achieve these purposes

[Key concepts:function, structure, features of texts; Key processes: classifying, comparing, explaining]

Language variation and change

Recognise some of the common variations in German as it is used in different contexts by different people

[Key concepts: variation, register; Key processes: noticing, comparing, exploring]


Recognise that German and English are related languages and that German is an important European and global language

[Key concepts: global language, culture, identity; Key processes: identifying, exploring, researching]

Role of language and culture

Make connections betweenanduse, for example, by identifying vocabulary and expressions that reflect cultural values, traditions or practices

[Key concepts: connections, values, traditions; Key processes: identifying, describing]

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Years 3 and 4 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 4, students interact with teachers and peers in classroom routines, action-related talk and play. They respond to instructions and use formulaic expressions to interact, ask questions, seek assistance, and make statements related to their personal worlds, for example, bitte schön ; Ich bin dran; Welche Farbe? Wie viele Geschwister hast du? Mein Lieblingsspiel ist Lotto . They reproduce German short and long single vowel and diphthong sounds, including Umlaute , and Eszett, and initial consonants and blends, for example, Post/los , mein , die, Bruder/Brüder , heißen, ja , rot , singen , Sport , Winter , zwei . They answer questions related to their personal worlds with factual information, and respond to imaginative texts by identifying favourite elements, sequencing main events and producing short scaffolded summaries. They create short, simple sentences from modelled language and use coordinating conjunctions, for example, und , aber , oder , to compose short original texts. They use some forms of common regular verbs in the present tense, (for example, heißen , kosten , spielen , wohnen) , some irregular verb forms, (for example , bin , bist , ist , sind , hast , hat ), and limited forms of modal verbs, (for example, kann , mag , möchte , muss) , simple past tense verbs, (for example , hatte , ging , war ) and the accusative case, (for example , Ich habe einen Hund.) . They respond to and use interrogatives, such as was , wann , wer , wie , wie viele , wo and some ja/nein questions. They refer to time, manner and place using familiar words and phrases, for example, morgen , sehr gut , im Wald . They compare aspects of German and English language and culture that are reflected in texts they have viewed, listened to or read and they create texts in German and English for the classroom and school community. They identify ways in which culture influences aspects of communication in routine exchanges such as greetings, and describe their own sense of identity, including elements such as family, cultural heritage and friends.

Students identify German as an important European and global language and give examples showing how it is related to English. They differentiate statements, questions, imperatives and exclamations according to intonation, sentence structure and punctuation. They identify the purpose of the Eszett and show how the Umlaut alters the pronunciation of particular vowels ( ä, ö, ü ). They identify single letters, some consonant clusters ( sch ) and vowel combinations ( au, ei, eu, ie ). They identify the audience and purpose of familiar personal, informative and imaginative texts. They give examples of how language use varies according to the participants, purpose and context of an exchange. They give examples of how language and culture are intrinsically linked, and identify cultural values, traditions or practices that are conveyed in words and expressions they and others use.

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Years 5 and 6  

Years 5 and 6 Band Description

The nature of the learners At this level, students are expanding their social networks, experiences and communication repertoire in both their first language and German. They continue to need guidance and participate in structured, collaborative tasks that both recycle and extend language. They are gaining greater independence and becoming more conscio

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The nature of the learners

At this level, students are expanding their social networks, experiences and communication repertoire in both their first language and German. They continue to need guidance and participate in structured, collaborative tasks that both recycle and extend language. They are gaining greater independence and becoming more conscious of their peers and social context, and of the world around them. They are noticing additional similarities and differences between German language and culture and their own.

German language learning and use

Learners use German with one another and the teacher for an increasing range of purposes: exchanging information, expressing ideas and feelings, and functioning within a German learning environment. They are able to work increasingly independently, but enjoy working collaboratively as well as competing with one another. Learners’ ability to communicate within familiar contexts is developing in terms of fluency and accuracy. Their pronunciation, intonation and phrasing are more confident, and they control and access wider vocabulary resources and use an increasing range of strategies to negotiate meaning. Shared tasks develop social, cognitive and language skills, and provide a context for purposeful language experience and experimentation. Focused attention to language structures and systems, literacy skills development, and exploration of cultural elements of communication are conducted at least in part in German. Learners use digital technologies to support their learning in increasingly independent and intentional ways, such as exchanging resources and information with one another and with young people of the same age in German-speaking communities, accessing music and media resources, maintaining blogs and other web pages, creating presentations, and participating in social networks.

Oracy development at this level includes active listening to a range of input from different sources and building more elaborated conversational and interactional skills. This involves turn-taking, ‘reading’ language for cultural and contextual meaning, building on others’ contributions, and making appropriate responses and adjustments. Learners begin to engage in debate and discussion. Individual and group oral presentation and performance skills are developed through researching and organising information; structuring, rehearsing and resourcing the content of presentations; and selecting appropriate language to engage particular audiences.

Contexts of interaction

The contexts in which learners interact in learning and using German are sometimes extended beyond the classroom, school, home and community as they have some access to German speakers and cultural resources in wider contexts and communities such as through the use of digital technologies.

Texts and resources

Literacy development involves increasingly independent engagement with a wider range of texts. Learners use a range of cues and decoding strategies to assist comprehension. They make connections between ideas, contexts and language within and between texts. Learners are able to provide simple summaries of and responses to texts. They begin to produce clearly structured original texts for different audiences and purposes. With support they are able to edit their own written work for common grammatical and orthographic errors.

Features of German language use

Learners increase their range of German vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammar and textual knowledge. They use present tense forms of regular
and irregular verbs, including some modal verbs and common separable verbs, and use plural forms of nouns and possessive adjectives. They add detail and expand simple sentences by using adverbs, phrases and some conjunctions. They move between statement, question and imperative forms and use simple negative constructions. They develop metalanguage to comment on grammar and vocabulary. As they use German to interact in different situations and to engage with different resources, learners develop an understanding of how language and culture influence each other. They learn to recognise how language features and expressions reflect cultural values and experiences, for example, language variation relating to age, gender, and relationship between participants, and how grammatical forms or vocabulary choices can affect the ‘meaning’ that is made, for example, using informal or formal forms of address, or using adjectives expressing approval or disapproval. This leads to considering their own ways of communicating and using language, and to thinking about the construction of personal identity and the notion of multiple identities.

Level of support

While learners work more independently at this level, ongoing and systematic scaffolding, feedback and review support the interactive process of learning. Modelling and scaffolding are incorporated into task activity. Support materials include models, stimulus materials, and resources such as word charts, vocabulary lists, dictionaries and electronic reference resources.

The role of English

While the use of German in the classroom increases at this level, the use of English for discussion, reflection and explanation ensures the continued development of learners’ awareness of the nature and function of language generally as well as of their own emerging intercultural capability. Using both German and English in the classroom develops a sense of what it means to be bilingual.

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Years 5 and 6 Content Descriptions

Communicating
Socialising

Interact using descriptive and expressiveto share information about daily life, relate experiences and express feelings

[Key concepts: school, home, routines, relationships; Key processes: listening, describing]


Participate in guided tasks such as planning and organising events and completing transactions

[Key concepts: collaboration, organisation, responsibility; Key processes: organising, planning, budgeting]


Use simple questions, statements and responses to participate in and support classroom interactions and learning activities, and to indicate understanding and monitor own learning

[Key concepts: process, progress, outcome; Key processes: discussing, monitoring, reflecting]

Informing

Gather, compare and respond to information from different sources relating to social and natural worlds

[Key concepts: environment, lifestyles, relationships; Key processes: researching, collating, reading, viewing]


Convey information and opinions in different formats to suit specific audiences and purposes, selecting appropriate print and multimodal elements

[Key concepts: youth issues, audience; Key processes: representing, transposing, comparing]

Creating

Share and compare responses to characters, events and ideas in imaginative texts, making connections with own experience and feelings

[Key concepts: plot, mood, character; Key processes: recounting, describing, sequencing]


Present, reinterpret oralternative versions of imaginative texts, adapting events,or settings

[Key concepts: imagination, adaptation, character, setting; Key processes: imagining, creating, interpreting]

Translating

Explain aspects of Germanandfor family or peers, noticing that there are not always equivalent expressions in English

[Key concepts: equivalence, meaning; Key processes: interpreting, explaining, predicting]


a range of bilingual texts such as notices, announcements, photo stories, dialogues and instructions forlearning and the school community

[Key concepts: bilingualism, meaning; Key processes: translating, selecting, connecting]

Reflecting

Engage in intercultural interactions, describing aspects ofandthat are unfamiliar or uncomfortable, and discussing own reactions and adjustments

[Key concepts: language, culture, reaction; Key processes: observing, evaluating, reflecting]


Reflect on aspects of ownanduse, commenting on and suggesting reasons for what is similar/different and easy/difficult

[Key concepts: reflection, perception; Key processes: reflecting, analysing, comparing]

Understanding
Systems of language

Explain and apply basic rules for German pronunciation, intonation, spelling and punctuation

[Key concepts: pronunciation, writing systems, punctuation; Key processes: spelling, making connections, applying rules]


Develop and apply knowledge of German grammatical elements such astenses, modal verbs and case, combining them with an increasing range of nouns, adjectives and adverbs to construct sentences

[Key concepts:tenses and forms, variation, metalanguage; Key processes: applying, noticing patterns, understanding]


Recognise that different types of texts, such as narratives, recounts and informative and procedural texts, have certain conventions and can take different forms depending on thein which they are produced

[Key concepts: context, audience, functionality; Key processes: identifying, classifying, transforming]

Language variation and change

Recognise that there are variations in German as it is used in different contexts by different people, such as formal/informaland regional variations

[Key concepts: variation, place, identity; Key processes: observing, comparing, analysing]


Understand whyis important and recognise that languages and cultures change over time and influence one another

[Key concepts: change, borrowing, impact; Key processes: discovering, exploring, understanding]

Role of language and culture

Understand that own and others’use is shaped by and reflects the values, ideas and norms of a community

[Key concepts: norms, values; Key processes: observing, comparing, connecting]

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Years 5 and 6 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 6, students use written and spoken German for classroom interactions, to carry out transactions, and to share ideas and opinions, relate experiences and express feelings. They use complete sentences in familiar contexts to ask questions such as, Bist du fertig? Was machst du jetzt? Verstehst du das? respond to requests and share experiences of learning, for example, Ich kann gut sprechen, aber ich finde das Lesen und Schreiben schwierig . They use descriptive and expressive vocabulary, including adjectives such as aufgeregt, glücklich, nervös, sauer and traurig , to express feelings and make statements such as Ich nehme ein Käsebrötchen . They use appropriate intonation for simple statements, questions and exclamations, and correct pronunciation, for example, for the two different pronunciations of ch . They gather and compare information from different sources about social and natural worlds, and convey information and opinions in different formats to suit specific audiences and purposes. They describe characters, events and ideas encountered in texts, and re-create imaginative texts to reflect their imaginative experience. When creating texts, they manipulate modelled language to describe current, recurring and future actions, for example, Wir gehen morgen schwimmen. Kommst du mit? Es geht mir nicht gut. and produce original sentences with common regular and irregular verbs in the present tense, including limited forms of the modal verbs dürfen and müssen and some common separable verbs such as mitbringen and fernsehen . They use adjectives, adverbs and adverbial phrases to qualify meaning, for example, viel Wasser, neue Schuhe; lieber, oft, jeden Tag . They explain aspects of German language and culture, recognising that there are not always equivalent expressions in English, and create a range of bilingual texts to support their own language learning and the school community. They describe aspects of their intercultural interactions that are unfamiliar or uncomfortable, and discuss their own reactions and adjustments.

Students give examples of how German language and culture are continuously changing and are influenced by other languages and cultures. They identify and apply some of the systematic sentence structure and word order rules of German. They identify rules for pronunciation and apply phonic and grammatical knowledge to spell and write unfamiliar words, for example, words containing ch, j, w and z , and diphthongs such as au, ei, eu and ie . They apply the conventions of commonly used text types, and identify differences in language features and text structures. They give examples of the variety of ways German is used by different people in different contexts. They make connections between culture and language use, and identify ways that language use is shaped by and reflects the values, ideas and norms of a community.

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Years 7 and 8  

Years 7 and 8 Band Description

The nature of the learners These years represent a transition to secondary school. Students in this sequence bring with them an established capability to interact in different situations, to engage with a variety of texts and to communicate with some assistance about their immediate world and that of German-speaking communities. They have experience in

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The nature of the learners

These years represent a transition to secondary school. Students in this sequence bring with them an established capability to interact in different situations, to engage with a variety of texts and to communicate with some assistance about their immediate world and that of German-speaking communities. They have experience in analysing the major features of the language system and in reflecting on the nature of intercultural exchanges in which they are involved.

German language learning and use

German is used for a range of classroom interactions and transactions, and for creating and maintaining a new class dynamic, explaining and practising language forms, reflecting on ways of thinking and learning, and developing cultural understanding. Learners are encouraged to socialise and interact with users of German beyond the classroom. Additional opportunities for interaction in the target language are provided by purposeful and integrated use of digital technologies, including social media and a range of applications. Learners work collaboratively and independently in the target language, exploring different modes and genres of communication with particular reference to their current social, cultural and communicative interests and needs. They pool information, language knowledge and resources to plan, problem-solve, monitor and reflect. They use and adapt modelled and rehearsed language in familiar and unfamiliar contexts, increasingly generating original language. They make cross-curricular connections and explore intercultural experiences and perspectives, such as the notion of a shared understanding.

Contexts of interaction

While the primary context for learning is usually the German language classroom, there may be opportunities for interacting with peers in German-speaking contexts and with other learners of German, such as through the use of technology or relationships with partner schools. Learners may also have some contact with German speakers and cultural events in the local community.

Texts and resources

Learners listen to, read, view and interact with a widening range of texts for a variety of purposes (informative, transactional, imaginative, expressive). They apply learnt processing strategies and language knowledge, drawing on their grammatical and vocabulary knowledge and their understanding of text conventions and patterns to obtain meaning from texts. They make connections between texts and cultural frames, and reflect on aspects of the variability of language, identifying how cultural values and perspectives are embedded in language and how language choices determine how people, issues and circumstances are represented. They plan, create and present more complex and varied imaginative, informative and persuasive texts (shared stories, poetry, songs/raps, blogs, advertisements, reports, journal entries), applying appropriate conventions of text types. They design interactive events and collaborative tasks, and participate in discussions, games and competitions.

Features of German language use

Learners gain more control of grammatical and textual elements such as the case system, prepositions and tenses, using the present perfect (Perfekt) tense of verbs conjugated with haben and sein and the simple past (Imperfekt) tenses. They use German with increasing accuracy and fluency, drafting and editing texts to improve structure and effect and to clarify meaning. Learners build on their cumulative experience of learning languages to analyse the relationship between language and culture more critically. They identify cultural references in texts and consider how language frames and communicates perspectives and values. They make comparisons between their own language(s) and German, and reflect on the complexities involved in moving between languages and cultural systems. They monitor and reflect on their own intercultural experience and capability as second language learners, and identify their own personal and community practices and identities that reflect cultural influence.

Level of support

Particular support is required at this stage of second language learning to manage the transition to post-primary schooling and to encourage continued engagement. Opportunities to review and consolidate prior learning are balanced with provision of engaging and relevant new experiences and connections. Students are supported to develop increasing autonomy as language learners and users, to self-monitor, and to reflect on and adjust language in response to their experience in diverse contexts.

The role of English

While German is used in more extended and elaborated ways at this level, English is used when appropriate to allow for explanation, analysis and reflection in relation to abstract concepts.

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Years 7 and 8 Content Descriptions

Communicating
Socialising

Initiate and participate in interactions with peers and adults to discuss and exchange views and experiences

[Key concepts: neighbourhood, school, leisure; Key processes: discussing, commenting, comparing]


Engage in tasks and transactions that involve negotiation and problem-solving

[Key concepts: exploratory talk, exchange of ideas,management; Key processes: transacting, negotiating]


Interact in classroom activities and discussions through asking and responding to open-ended questions, giving opinions and making suggestions

[Key concepts: interaction, learning strategies, exchange; Key processes: responding, participating, advising]

Informing

Access, summarise and analyse information and opinions from a range of sources relating to topical issues of shared interest

[Key concepts: resources, values, issues; Key processes: summarising, reading, listening, analysing]


Convey information and ideas on different topics, issues and events, describing and comparing views, perspectives and experiences, and using modes of presentation to suit different audiences

[Key concepts: representations, perspectives; Key processes: comparing, classifying, organising]

Creating

Respond to a range of imaginative texts by expressing opinions and feelings about key ideas and making connections with personal experiences and other texts

[Key concepts: plot, character, emotions; Key processes: expressing, reviewing, comparing]


individual and shared texts about imagined people, places and experiences, to entertain others

[Key concepts: imagination, audience, entertainment; Key processes: composing, performing, experimenting]

Translating

and/or translate for friends or visitors terms associated with German or own culture

[Key concepts: relationship, meaning, idioms; Key processes: interpreting, explaining, translating]


bilingual resources such as games, vocabulary cards, glossaries, word lists and labelled posters for