Years F–10 Sequence

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Foundation to Year 2  

Foundation to Year 2 Band Description

The nature of the learners Children enter the early years of schooling with established communication in one or more languages and Auslan will be learnt as an additional language. Cognitive and social development at this stage is exploratory and egocentric; thus learning typically focuses on their immediate world of family, home, school and friends. Children

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The nature of the learners

Children enter the early years of schooling with established communication in one or more languages and Auslan will be learnt as an additional language. Cognitive and social development at this stage is exploratory and egocentric; thus learning typically focuses on their immediate world of family, home, school and friends. Children at this level are learning how to socialise with new people, share with others and participate in structured routines and activities at school. Auslan will be learnt in parallel with English literacy, and the learning of each language assists with the learning of the other.

Auslan learning and use

Rich language input characterises the first stages of learning. The curriculum builds on children’s interests and sense of enjoyment and curiosity, with an emphasis on active, experiential learning and confidence building. In these years there is an emphasis on developing language to enable learners to participate in class activities such as storytelling and games. Creative play provides opportunities for using the language for purposeful interaction in a relaxed and informal context.

Children build vocabulary for thinking and talking about school topics, routines and processes. They build knowledge and understanding of Auslan by interacting with each other, the teacher and deaf children, and by participating in structured routines and activities. With support and modelling, they use Auslan for different functions such as greeting, thanking, apologising, asking and responding to questions, expressing wishes, likes or dislikes, following simple directions, and taking turns in games and simple shared learning activities. They learn to produce signed phrases independently using modelled language, for example by describing simple pictures.

Contexts of interaction

The primary context for interaction is the language classroom, with the Auslan teacher and classmates. Learners’ use of Auslan primarily relates to classroom routines and activities and to talking about their own life. Additional language enrichment may be gained through interactions with visitors from the Deaf community.

Texts and resources

Texts include filmed children’s stories and teacher-generated materials such as pictures or short descriptions. Learners watch live and filmed texts such as explanations. They respond to resources such as short video clips, or substitution or matching exercises, and produce texts such as conversations using formulaic language.

Features of Auslan use

Children in Foundation to Year 2 become familiar with all handshapes, movements and locations of single signs. They are learning to produce simple positive and negative statements with some time marking, and to use plain verbs or unmodified indicating verbs. They learn to describe familiar objects, animals or people using simple lexical adjectives and to depict the movement of people, animals and means of transport using an appropriate classifier handshape in an entity depicting sign. They are able to use simple handling and SASS depicting signs. They explore emotions through the use of NMFs, and begin to use NMFs for grammatical purposes in modelled language. They learn to use simple constructed action to represent the characteristics of a single animal or themselves or another. They learn the metalanguage of nouns, verbs and adjectives, and learn that signers can modify verbs to show the referents involved.

As children learn to adjust their language to suit different purposes and situations, they begin to understand how culture shapes language use. They compare how they feel when they use different languages and how they view different languages and people who use them. This introduction to the meta dimension of intercultural learning develops the ability to ‘decentre’, to consider different perspectives and ways of being, and to become aware of themselves as communicators and cultural participants.

Level of support

Support is provided through visual and tactile materials, such as pictures, objects and charts, and the use of gesture and modelling. The main source of support is the teacher’s talk, such as questions and statements, explanations, prompts, recycling of language, stories and feedback. Learners rely on modelled language and scaffolded tasks to create their own texts, for example, choosing signs to complete sentences or using pictures to sequence a story that has been told to them.

The role of English

Learners are encouraged to use Auslan whenever possible, with the teacher providing rich and supported language input. English is used as a medium of instruction and for explanation and discussion or in areas from the Understanding strand. This allows learners to talk about differences and similarities that they notice between Auslan and their first language(s) and culture(s), to ask questions about language and culture, to consider how they feel when they see or use Auslan.

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Foundation to Year 2 Content Descriptions

Communicating
Socialising

Participate in simple interactions with their peers and teachers using high-frequency signs,and gestures to talk about self, family and class activities

[Key concepts: self, family, friends, experience, feelings; Key processes: interacting, greeting, asking/answering questions, describing]


Participate in guided group activities such as signing games and simple tasks using repeatedstructures, facial expressions and gestures

[Key concepts: games, space, place, memory; Key processes: playing, singing, following instructions, exchanging, classifying]


Develop interaction andskills for participation in regular class routines and activities

[Key concepts: fingerspelling, attention, signing space, visual communication; Key processes: interacting, signing, recognising, gaining attention]

Informing

Identify specific points of information in simple Auslan texts relating to people, places and things and use the information to complete guided tasks

[Key concepts: information, topics; Key processes: identifying, categorising responding, gathering]


Present information about self, family, school and significant objects, using modelled signs and formulaic phrases

[Key concepts: self, family, routines; Key processes: presenting, describing, contributing, demonstrating, recounting]

Creating

Participate in the shared viewing of recorded or live imaginative signed texts, responding through drawing, miming,or familiar signs

[Key concepts: imagination, expression; Key processes: viewing, drawing, re-enacting, mimicking, signing]


Express imaginative ideas and visual thinking through the use of familiar signs, mime and gestures, with a focus on emotions, appearance and actions

[Key concepts: imagination, emotion, expression; Key processes: re-enacting, depicting, creating]

Translating

Translate words used in everyday contexts from Auslan into English and vice versa

[Key concepts: similarity, difference, meaning; Key processes: recognising, comparing, identifying, translating, explaining]


simple print orsuch as labels, posters, wall charts or cards that use Auslan images and English words

[Key concepts: meaning, code, bilingualism; Key processes: labelling, creating]

Identity

Describe aspects of themselves, such as membership of family and their school/class and languages they use, considering how these different elements contribute to their sense of identity

[Key concepts: identity, similarity, difference, self, family, belonging; Key processes: noticing, identifying, describing, explaining, comparing]

Reflecting

Notice what is similar to or different from their ownand culture when interacting with stories, games and different forms of artistic expression in Auslan and from Deaf culture

[Key concepts: language, culture, similarity, difference, respect; Key processes: noticing, comparing, responding]

Understanding
Systems of language

Recognise that meaning can be expressed through English words or Auslan signs and that signs have set handshapes, movements and locations, and identify and reproduce them independently

[Key concepts: handshape, movement, location, iconicity; Key processes: identifying, noticing, recognising, understanding]


Recognise and restrict signing to the standard signing space, and understand that pronouns, depicting signs and verbs can be located meaningfully in that space

[Key concepts: signing space, verb modification, depicting signs; Key processes: noticing, identifying, recognising]


Recognise that groups of words are combined to make aand that Auslan has word classes such as nouns, adjectives or verbs, and distinguish between statements and questions

[Key concepts: sign class, clauses, statements, questions; Key processes: recognising, observing]


Understand that texts are made up of units of meaning such as groups of words or sentences and that different types of texts have different features that help serve their purpose

[Key concepts: text,types; Key processes: recognising, noticing]

Language variation and change

Understand that all languages includingvary and borrow words and signs from each other

[Key concepts:borrowing, variation; Key processes: noticing, recognising]

Language awareness

Recognise that Auslan is a legitimate language, one of many languages used in Australia and around the world

[Key concepts:diversity, difference, vitality; Key processes: identifying, exploring, recognising]

Role of language and culture

Notice that people usein ways that reflect their culture, such as where and how they live, who they live with and what is important to them

[Key concepts: language, culture, community, observable phenomena; Key processes: noticing, recognising, questioning, making connections]

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Foundation to Year 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students interact with teachers and each other to talk about themselves, their families, friends and immediate environment. They follow instructions to complete action-based activities such as signing games or transactional activities, using repeated constructions, gestures and affective non-manual features (NMFs). They interact in familiar classroom routines by responding to requests, such as DS:line-up PLEASE, LOOK-AT-me PRO1. Students ask and respond to simple questions and distinguish between statements and questions. They express likes, dislikes and feelings using lexical signs and affective NMFs. They recognise and produce fingerspelled names for roll call and games and produce modelled signs, phrases and sentence patterns in familiar contexts. They use culturally appropriate protocols, such as maintaining eye contact and responding to and gaining attention by waving or tapping a shoulder or table. They identify specific information in signed texts, such as the properties of colour, number, size or shape, and describe people and objects, for example, PRO3 5-YEARS-OLD, PRO1 HAVE 2 BROTHER , or THAT BALL BIG . Students demonstrate simple procedures using known signs, gestures, objects and list buoys. They recount and sequence shared events using familiar signs and visual prompts. They view short imaginative and expressive texts such as stories and nursery rhymes, demonstrating understanding through drawing, gesture, modelled signs or English. They use fixed handshapes in creative ways, for example to create amusing sequences of signs to enact movements, and portray characteristics through the use of constructed action. They identify similarities and differences in ways they interact when communicating in English and in Auslan.

Students know that Auslan is a language in its own right, different from mime and gestures used in spoken languages. They know that eye contact is necessary for effective communication and that meaning is communicated visually through the use of whole signs, gestures or fingerspelling. They identify and categorise signs according to handshape and they recognise major types of path movements. They know that some signs link to the appearance of a referent, for example PEN, HOUSE , and that some words, such as proper nouns, are borrowed from English by fingerspelling and mouthing. They know that locations of signs can be modified to change meaning, for example when pointing to people. They recognise the importance of facial expression, eye gaze and other NMFs in a visual-gestural language and culture and know that sign order is flexible in Auslan.

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Years 3 and 4  

Years 3 and 4 Band Description

The nature of the learners Learners at this level are developing their cognitive and social capabilities and their communicative repertoire in the language, as well as becoming increasingly aware of their social worlds and their membership of various groups, including their Auslan class. They are more independent and less egocentric, enjoying both competitive

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The nature of the learners

Learners at this level are developing their cognitive and social capabilities and their communicative repertoire in the language, as well as becoming increasingly aware of their social worlds and their membership of various groups, including their Auslan class. They are more independent and less egocentric, enjoying both competitive and cooperative activities. They are able to conceptualise and reason, and have better memory and focus. They benefit from varied, activity-based learning that builds on their interests and capabilities and makes connections with other areas of learning.

Auslan learning and use

Learners in this band engage in a range of activities in Auslan and share ideas about the language. They respond to teacher-generated questions about texts, participate in games and give brief presentations about topics such as family, pets, or a favourite game or object. They continue to build vocabulary for thinking and talking about school topics. The language used in routine activities is re-used and reinforced from lesson to lesson in different situations, making connections between what has been learnt and what is to be learnt. Learners follow instructions, watch stories and participate in creating short texts on topics relevant to their interests and enjoyment, such as family, pets, favourite activities or food. They recount experiences, interact with visitors, follow directions, negotiate roles in a group and retell important information.

Contexts of interaction

Learning occurs largely through interaction with peers and the teaching team in the language classroom and the broader school environment, with some sharing of their learning at home. They also have some access to the wider Deaf community and resources through virtual and digital technology. The familiarity and routine dimension of the classroom context provide scaffolding and opportunities for language practice and experimentation.

Texts and resources

Learners typically interact with teacher-generated materials, games and songs, and materials produced for learning Auslan, such as computer games or online videos. They may be exposed to texts developed for deaf children as a way of developing their cultural awareness.

Features of Auslan use

Learners at this stage are increasingly aware of differences between Auslan and English. They are developing a wide range of vocabulary and can use simple clause structures to generate their own ideas in structured tasks. They use depicting signs to talk about simple movements and shapes, and with support can represent the viewpoint of a single participant through constructed action. They begin modifying more indicating verbs for present referents and use specific time marking incorporating numerals in their recounts. They are learning to use NMFs to mark manner on verbs or to express negation. Students at this level explore cultural constructs and practices and the language associated with these. Metalinguistically, learners can describe differences between how to show or tell about an event, understand that adverbs modify verbs and that clauses contain what happened, who was involved and surrounding circumstances.

Level of support

The primary support for learners is the Auslan teacher, who provides instruction, explanation, examples, repetition, reinforcement and feedback. Learners create their own texts based on modelled language and teacher guidance. Form-focused activities, particularly those increasing metalinguistic awareness, build students’ grammatical knowledge and support the development of accuracy and control in Auslan. Tasks and activities are carefully scaffolded and resourced with supports such as pictures, flashcards, gestures, objects and multimedia. Discussion supports learning and develops learners’ conceptual frame for talking about systems of language and culture.

The role of English

Learners use Auslan for classroom routines and structured learning tasks, and for watching texts. They are supported by the teacher to notice and discuss aspects of Auslan and Deaf culture, and to compare Auslan to other known languages and cultures. English is used for class discussions when noticing, comparing and reflecting on both English and Auslan, as well as for accessing some printed material related to topics in the Understanding strand.

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Years 3 and 4 Content Descriptions

Communicating
Socialising

Communicate with each other and with teachers about aspects of their personal worlds, daily routines, preferences and pastimes

[Key concepts: routines, interests, personal worlds; Key processes: recounting, describing, expressing preferences]


Participate in shared learning activities that involve planning, transacting and problem-solving, using simple signed statements, questions and directions

[Key concepts: task, role, responsibility, clarification, encouragement; Key processes: collaborating, following directions, negotiating, asking for help]


Respond to questions, directions and requests, usingand simple questions and statements to ask for help, to indicate understanding or agreement and to negotiate turn-taking

[Key concepts: instruction, clarification, turn-taking, back-channel, attention, eye contact; Key processes: responding, asking for help, turn-taking, using back-channel, gaining attention]

Informing

Organise and summarise key points of information obtained from different types of Auslan texts

[Key concepts: sequence, information, format; Key processes: organising, summarising, identifying, surveying, retelling, recording]


Present information associated with their home, school and community activities and routines, using signed descriptions and visual prompts

[Key concepts: recount, description, sequence; Key processes: presenting, demonstrating, recounting]

Creating

Engage with different types of imaginative texts, identifying favourite elements, characters and events and responding through modelled signing, actions and drawing

[Key concepts: story, character, response; Key processes: responding, comparing, retelling, drawing]


simple texts that demonstrate imagination and playfulness, using familiar signs, gestures, modelledand visual supports

[Key concepts: play, imagination, character; Key processes: creating, performing, retelling]

Translating

Translate high-frequency signs/words and expressions in simple texts such as repeated lines in a story, noticing which ones are difficult to interpret

[Key concepts: similarity, difference, meaning; Key processes: matching, noticing, identifying, translating]


bilingual versions of texts such as English captioned recordings of Auslan phrases

[Key concepts: meaning, representation; Key processes: creating]

Identity

Consider how their ways of communicating and responding to each other shape and reflect their sense of identity

[Key concepts: identity, similarity, difference, community, membership, communication; Key processes: observing, identifying, creating, noticing, discussing, comparing]

Reflecting

Describe ways in which communicating and behaving when using Auslan are similar to or different from their use of their own language(s) and forms of cultural expression

[Key concepts: language, culture, values, similarity, difference, communication; Key processes: noticing, comparing, describing, explaining, questioning, reflecting]

Understanding
Systems of language

Identify the movement and location of different signs and notice how they combine withto form signs, and understand that Auslan can be videoed and transcribed to assist learning

[Key concepts: orientation, hand dominance, iconicity, non-manual features, recording language; Key processes: identifying, recognising, comparing]

Understand how space is used in Auslan to show who is involved in an event through the meaningful location of nouns and verbs, the use of depicting signs and enacting

[Key concepts: signing space, numeral incorporation, verb modification; Key processes: recognising, discussing, comparing]


Understand that clauses can be enriched through the use of adjectives and adverbs (when, where, how), often produced with non-manual features

[Key concepts: verb types, adverbs,structure, questions; Key processes: recognising, distinguishing, observing]


Understand how signers make differentchoices in different types of texts and compare this with English versions oftypes, and notice how texts build cohesion

[Key concepts: textual features, similarity, difference, cohesion; Key processes: recognising, discussing, comparing]

Language variation and change

Recognise that there is variation in Auslan use, for example in different locations or physical environments

[Key concepts: variation, adaptation; Key processes: identifying, recognising, exploring, considering]

Language awareness

Develop awareness of the social and cultural nature and context of Auslan and other sign languages, of their different modes of expression and of the related issue ofvitality

[Key concepts: communication,vitality, culture, accessibility; Key processes: identifying, describing, recognising]

Role of language and culture

Explore connections betweenand cultural values and beliefs and the expression of these connections in Auslan

[Key concepts: language, culture, identity, symbol; Key processes: exploring, understanding, noticing, recognising, questioning, making connections]

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Years 3 and 4 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 4, students participate in classroom routines and structured interactions with teachers and peers. They communicate about daily routines, interests and pastimes; recount personal experiences and classroom events; and describe people, experiences or activities using simple depicting signs, such as DS:run-around-oval THEN DS:sit-in-circle . They express preferences, follow directions and ask for clarification or help. They play games that involve making choices, exchanging information and negotiating turn-taking. They use non-manual features to indicate understanding, interest or lack of interest. They use culturally appropriate protocols, such as gaining attention by waving, tapping or pointing to alert third parties and maintain eye contact when communicating, for example PRO2 MEAN or … RIGHT PRO1? They identify, summarise/paraphrase and retell key points of information in signed texts such as announcements, directions for a game or presentations by visitors, for example PRO1 FIRST YOUR-TURN . They recount in correct sequence the main points of an event or favourite elements of a signed story, using modified indicating verbs, such as POSS1 FAVOURITE PART PRO3 TAKE MONEY THEN RUN-that direction. They present routine class information, such as weather reports or daily schedules, using visual prompts and signed descriptions. They create their own simple imaginative texts and retell wordless animations using familiar signs, gestures, modelled language and visual supports. They translate high-frequency signs/words and expressions in simple texts. They reflect on their own cultural identity and ways of communicating in light of their experience of learning Auslan.

Students compare fingerspelling with written English, noticing that it can be used for whole words or for parts of words. They recognise that there are signs that have no single English word equivalent, and know that signs can be displaced in space for different purposes, such as to show locations or different participants in a verb. They know that signing involves telling, depicting or enacting. They recognise variation in how Auslan is used, for example by recognising regional dialects and differences in signing space. They identify different ways Deaf community members communicate with each other and with members of the wider hearing community, for example, face to face, via technology, social media and interpreters. They know that culture is closely related to language and to identity and involves both visible and invisible elements.

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Years 5 and 6  

Years 5 and 6 Band Description

The nature of the learners Learners at this level are expanding their social networks, experiences and communication repertoire in both their first language and Auslan. They continue to need guidance and participate in structured, collaborative tasks that both recycle and extend language. They are gaining greater independence and becoming more conscious of th

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The nature of the learners

Learners at this level are expanding their social networks, experiences and communication repertoire in both their first language and Auslan. They continue to need guidance and participate in structured, collaborative tasks that both recycle and extend language. They are gaining greater independence and becoming more conscious of their peers and social context. They are gaining awareness of the world around them and of nature of the Deaf community in Australia. They notice similarities and differences between Auslan and Deaf culture and their own language(s) and culture(s).

Auslan learning and use

Learners use well-known phrases in Auslan to participate in classroom routines, presentations and structured conversations with the teacher and peers. They focus on aspects of their personal worlds and are introduced to content related to Auslan, the Deaf community and other learning areas. Learners develop their capability in Auslan through scaffolded tasks and texts such as descriptions and stories. They are learning to apply their knowledge of key signs and textual features to predict the meaning of unfamiliar language. They use modelled language to create texts such as narratives. They use Auslan to paraphrase; form questions to request information; interview others; plan, rehearse and deliver short presentations; and to compare interests and activities. They extend their language use by expressing ideas through expanding and connecting clauses.

Contexts of interaction

Learners use Auslan to interact with the teacher and their classmates, and may use technology to communicate with deaf peers in other contexts. Tasks are typically structured, collaborative and at times competitive, such as group performances, class displays or games. Language development and use are incorporated into collaborative and interactive learning experiences and activities. Learners may notice the use of Auslan in the community, such as in the media.

Texts and resources

Learners engage with a growing range of signers and videoed signed texts. They also engage with resources prepared by their teacher, including games, performances, presentations and language exercises. They may have additional access to Auslan and Deaf culture through resources created for the Australian Deaf community, such as children’s television programs, websites or video clips. In addition, they make use of texts from other signed languages that make extensive use of the ‘visual vernacular’.

Features of Auslan use

Learners are expanding their knowledge of vocabulary and sentence construction. With support, they use constructed action to show participants in a narrative, modify indicating verbs for non-present referents with increasing accuracy across a text, and use more complex entity depicting signs. Learners are developing a metalanguage for describing aspects of Auslan and how it is structured, such as how signers use different means to refer to things for cohesion in a text. They are increasingly aware of the connection between language and cultural practices and compare such connections to their own language and culture.

Discussion, reflection and explanation ensure the continued development of learners’ knowledge base and metalinguistic and intercultural capabilities. Understanding of the relationship between language, culture and identity is developed through guided investigation of how language features and expressions carry specific cultural meaning; through critical analysis of cultural stereotypes, attitudes and perspectives; and through exploration of issues related to personal and community identities. Students reflect on the relationship between language, culture and identity and how these affect communication and intercultural experience through the lens of their own bicultural experiences.

Level of support

Support provided by the teacher at this level includes explicit instruction, description, and comparison of Auslan and English; modelled language use and examples of texts; and feedback on and review of student work. Learning experiences incorporate implicit and explicit form-focused language learning activities and examples of texts and tasks. Learners need practice and guidance in using dictionaries, especially Signbank, and access to word charts, vocabulary lists and examples when translating and creating texts.

The role of English

Auslan is used for classroom routines and language learning tasks and may be used as the language of instruction for learning the content of other learning areas. The language of response varies according to task demands, with Auslan used primarily for communicating in structured and supported tasks and English for open-ended, comparative tasks that develop learners’ understanding of language and culture. English may also be used to research cultural issues where the source text is not available in Auslan.

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Years 5 and 6 Content Descriptions

Communicating
Socialising

Share ideas and feelings about people they know, their daily lives, social activities and the school community

[Key concepts: experience, interaction, interests, relationship; Key processes: describing, discussing, responding, comparing, expressing feelings]


Collaborate with peers to plan and conduct shared events or activities such as performances, presentations, demonstrations or transactions

[Key concepts: performance, presentation, Deaf culture; Key processes: planning, negotiating, organising]


Communicate appropriately while involved in shared learning activities by asking and responding to questions, managing interactions, indicating understanding and monitoring learning

[Key concepts: agreement, clarification, protocol, reflection; Key processes: responding, agreeing, monitoring]

Informing

Collect, classify and paraphrase information from a variety of Auslan texts used in school and community contexts

[Key concept: information, findings, concepts; Key processes: identifying, collecting, classifying, paraphrasing, responding, explaining, requesting, interviewing]


Convey information in different formats to suit different audiences and contexts

[Key concepts: context, purpose, audience; Key processes: presenting, creating]

Creating

Engage with a range of creative and imaginative texts, identifying and discussing ideas and characters and making connections with their own experiences

[Key concepts: narrative, theatre performance, emotional response, humour; Key processes: sequencing, comparing, shadowing, reflecting]


or reinterpret simple imaginative texts that involve favourite characters or humorous situations, using a range of signs, gestures and supporting props to convey events, characters or settings

[Key concepts: constructed action, perspective, choreography; Key processes: adapting, performing, retelling, dancing]

Translating

Translate familiar texts from Auslan to English and vice versa, noticing which words or phrases require interpretation or explanation

[Key concepts: equivalence, meaning, interpretation; Key processes: identifying, translating, shadowing, creating, comparing]


their own bilingual texts and learning resources such as electronic displays, websites or digital newsletters

[Key concepts: bilingualism, meaning; Key process: composing, creating]

Identity

Demonstrate understanding of the nature ofin relation to themselves and to members of the Deaf community

[Key concepts: identity, community, history; Key processes: documenting, creating, sharing, evaluating, comparing]

Reflecting

Reflect on howand cultural background influence perceptions of other languages and communities, and on their experience of learning and communicating in Auslan

[Key concepts: influence, perspective, perception, self-reflection; Key processes: comparing, sharing, monitoring, identifying, analysing, explaining, reflecting]

Understanding
Systems of language

Identify and describe elements of sign production, includingand its orientation, movement, location and non-manual features, and explore the processes of annotating Auslan videos or reading and transcribing glossed texts

[Key concepts: body anchored, iconicity; Key processes: identifying, recognising, annotating, glossing]


Understand that signs can include different information, including a gestural overlay, identify types of depicting signs and how signers establish spatial locations and show constructed action

[Key concepts: gestural overlay, establishing a spatial location, function of constructed action; Key processes: recognising, distinguishing]

Develop understanding of the important role ofin adverbs and joining clauses, and know that spatial relationships in Auslan are typically expressed with depicting signs

[Key concepts: manner, locatives, topicalisation; Key processes: recognising, distinguishing]


Identify and usefeatures of different types of Auslan texts and understand that texts are made cohesive throughchoices

[Key concepts:features, cohesion,tracking; Key processes: identifying, analysing]

Language variation and change

Explore variation in terms of the impact of other languages on Auslan across contexts and over time

[Key concepts: influence,borrowing, style shifts; Key processes: noticing, recognising, explaining]

Language awareness

Explore the current status and profile of Auslan and of thein contemporary Australian society, considering issues such astransmission, usage and documentation

[Key concepts: diversity, representation,transmission, documentation; Key processes: recognising, describing, understanding, discussing, investigating]

Role of language and culture

Reflect on how communities’ ways of using languages are shaped by, reflect and strengthen cultural values and beliefs and how these may be differently interpreted by users of other languages

[Key concepts: cultural expression and transmission, values, beliefs; Key processes: observing, making connections, discussing, investigating]

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Years 5 and 6 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 6, students discuss aspects of their daily lives, social activities and school experience and respond to each other’s comments. They describe relationships and characteristics of people and objects and express feelings and preferences, for example, POSS1 FRIEND CHANGE OTHER SCHOOL PRO1 SAD . They negotiate with each other to plan, organise and complete learning tasks and activities, using statements such as PRO1 DON’T-WANT DRAW, PRO1 WANT TAKE-PHOTO, THANKYOU PRO2 EXPLAIN CLEAR , or THAT FIRST IMPORTANT THAT SECOND . They follow more complex instructions and directions involving several steps. They compare experiences, routines, interests and activities, using signs associated with time, sequence and location. They follow protocols when interacting with each other or with interpreters or visitors to the classroom, for example by interrupting conversations appropriately or providing context for a new participant joining a conversation. They paraphrase the content of selected signed texts, such as community announcements, and relay the information to others. They plan, rehearse and deliver short presentations, taking into account context, purpose and audience. They respond to creative and imaginative texts, for example by discussing ideas and characters, shadowing signed elements of theatrical or cinematographic texts that use handshapes, and by making connections with their own experiences. They create or reinterpret simple imaginative texts using elements of constructed action (CA), such as body shift, eye gaze and head orientation change. They modify non-manual features and lexical signs to indicate manner. They translate familiar texts from Auslan to English and vice versa, identifying which words or phrases require interpretation or explanation.

Students discriminate between body-anchored and non-body-anchored signs, and recognise how non-body-anchored signs can modify their locations meaningfully. They know that the function of CA is to represent the words, thoughts or actions of a protagonist in a text, either themselves or others, and that spatial relationships between objects are typically expressed with depicting signs in Auslan. They understand different ways that English words are borrowed into Auslan and identify connections between Auslan and other signed languages, for example, BSL, ISL and ASL. They recognise the diversity of Auslan users in the community, including people who are deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing people such as CODAs or interpreters. Students recognise how Auslan has been transmitted across generations and describe different ways it has been documented and recorded, for example, by glossing and the use of technology such as ELAN. Students reflect on the ways culture is differently interpreted by others, for example by identifying how stereotypes about deaf and hearing people influence perceptions.

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Years 7 and 8  

Years 7 and 8 Band Description

The nature of the learners The transition to secondary schooling involves social and academic demands that coincide with a period of maturational and physical change. Learners are adjusting to a new school culture with sharper divisions between curriculum areas. There is a need for continuity through change in relation to their language learning. Students in

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The nature of the learners

The transition to secondary schooling involves social and academic demands that coincide with a period of maturational and physical change. Learners are adjusting to a new school culture with sharper divisions between curriculum areas. There is a need for continuity through change in relation to their language learning. Students in this pathway are continuing to study Auslan, bringing with them a capability to communicate, with some assistance, about their immediate world and the Deaf community. They have experience in analysing the major features of the language system and in considering intercultural exchanges, including their role in these. However, learners at this level may find themselves in classes that include learners with a range of previous experience with Auslan and Deaf culture. A multilevel and differentiated approach to teaching and task design responds to this diversity of prior experience.

At this level, students bring a range of learning strategies to their language learning. They are increasingly aware of the world beyond their own and are engaging with broader issues of youth and society, land and environment, education and identity, while establishing a balance between increasing personal independence and social responsibilities. They are considering their future pathways and choices, including how Auslan might be part of these.

Auslan learning and use

Learners interact using Auslan in classroom routines and communicative tasks. They use Auslan to compare and contrast, sign instructions, problem-solve, make announcements, persuade, and recount experiences in increasing detail. They are able to express their feelings and emotions creatively in Auslan.

Contexts of interaction

The primary context for learning remains the Auslan class; however, there may be opportunities for interacting with deaf students from other schools and with other learners of Auslan, for example through technology and sister-school relationships. Learners may be exposed to Auslan signers from the Deaf community through visiting speakers, media and community events.

Texts and resources

Learners engage with a range of increasingly complex live and digital signed texts designed for learning Auslan in school. Authentic texts created for Deaf people, such as websites, provide extra opportunities to extend understanding of language and culture. Texts come from a range of domains or genres, such as community announcements, vlogs and stories, and serve a variety of purposes, such as informative, transactional, communicative, imaginative and expressive. The Deaf community is the most important resource for learning because it is the origin of most of the texts and communicative situations engaged with by learners.

Features of Auslan use

Learners are extending their grammatical knowledge, such as how language structures and features are used in texts. They are using more elaborate sentence structures, including conjoining clauses, and are increasingly making their texts cohesive by setting up and maintaining referents in signing space. Learners are exploring non-manual features (NMFs) and their relationship with clause types, and are beginning to use constructed action to represent multiple participants in a text. They are increasingly aware of connections between language and culture, comparing them to concepts in their own language and culture. They are learning to reflect on their own language and culture and on how identity impacts on intercultural experiences.

Level of support

Particular support is required at this stage of learning to manage the transition to secondary schooling and to encourage continued engagement with language learning. Opportunities to review and consolidate prior learning are balanced against provision of engaging and relevant new experiences and tasks that are more challenging. Learners require modelled language use and explicit instruction in grammatical knowledge, with comparison between English and Auslan. They need support in using dictionaries, particularly in determining base signs and choosing appropriate meanings for the context. Learners continue to access visual glossaries, charts and examples to support their receptive and productive language use. The teacher continues to provide implicit and explicit modelling and scaffolding in relation to meaningful language use in a range of contexts, and explicit instruction and explanation in relation to language structures, grammatical functions, vocabulary and abstract cultural concepts. Learners at this level are encouraged to self-monitor, for example, by keeping records of feedback and through peer support, and to self-review and adjust language in response to their experiences in different contexts.

The role of English

Auslan is used for classroom interaction, language learning tasks and experiences, and, with support, reflection on learning. Auslan may also be used for learning new content drawn from other learning areas. English is used for analysis, comparison and reflection in relation to abstract concepts and more substantive discussion. English may also be used to research cultural issues where a source text is not available in Auslan. Learners continue to develop a metalanguage for thinking and talking about language, culture, identity and about the experience of learning and using Auslan.

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Years 7 and 8 Content Descriptions

Communicating
Socialising

Interact appropriately with people in different contexts, sharing experiences, interests and opinions about current events or school and community experience

[Key concepts: protocol, turn-taking, interaction; Key processes: socialising, comparing, turn-taking, clarifying]


Engage in different processes of collaborative learning, including planning, problem-solving, task completion and evaluation

[Key concepts: design, communication, reflection; Key processes: collaborating, designing, creating, presenting, problem-solving, reflecting]


Participate in extended interactions by explaining and clarifying answers, responding to others’ contributions, asking follow-up questions and observingin and beyond the classroom

[Key concepts: interaction, signing space, discussion, context, environment, protocols; Key processes: responding, commenting, adjusting, contextualising]

Informing

Collate and analyse information accessed through a variety of signed texts to present an overview or develop a position on issues or interests

[Key concepts: perspective, representation; Key processes: collating, analysing, researching, interviewing, evaluating, surveying]


Present information on different events or experiences to inform, report, promote, instruct or invite action

[Key concepts: action, experience; Key processes: instructing, reporting, persuading, inviting]

Creating

different types of texts that involve the expression of feelings or experiences and the representation of imagined people, places and scenarios, sharing and comparing their responses to different elements

[Key concepts: expression, manner, metaphorical iconicity; Key processes: comparing, evaluating, describing, exploring, profiling]


and present entertaining individual or collaborative texts that reflect real or imagined people, places or experiences

[Key concepts: improvisation, diorama, role-play, theme; Key processes: creating, improvising, collaborating, re-creating, role-playing]

Translating

Translate andless familiar short texts and compare their translations to those of their classmates, considering why there might be differences in interpretation and howreflects elements of culture and experience

[Key concepts: equivalence, meaning, interpretation, culture, ethics; Key processes: translating, interpreting, comparing, paraphrasing, summarising]


bilingual texts to use in the wider school community, identifying words/signs or expressions that carry specific cultural meaning in either language

[Key concepts: equivalence, bilingualism; Key processes: captioning, creating]

Identity

Consider their own and each other’s cultural experiences and ways of expressingand reflect on the role of Auslan in building and expressingfor Deaf people

[Key concepts: identity, perspective, belonging, wellbeing; Key processes: reflecting, comparing, describing, discussing, investigating, analysing]

Reflecting

Reflect on their intercultural interactions and experiences, for example by considering their responses when engaging with Auslan users or digital resources, and on how these responses reflect their own languages and cultures

[Key concepts: intercultural experience, ways of knowing and being, discrimination; Key processes: comparing, analysing, explaining, reflecting, exploring]

Understanding
Systems of language

Identify different types ofand characteristics of signs, including iconicity, and explore the use of software to transcribe and annotate signed texts

[Key concepts: iconicity, annotation, transcription; Key processes: identifying, classifying, glossing, annotating, transcribing]


Develop knowledge of additional elements of the Auslan grammatical system, analysing indicating verbs, depicting signs and constructed action

[Key concepts: grammatical use of space, depicting signs; Key processes: understanding, distinguishing, analysing]


Understand and control additional elements of Auslan grammar, such as the use offor negation or conditional forms, and understand how signers useand depicting signs in composite utterances

[Key concepts:types and their NMFs, composite utterances; Key processes: recognising, analysing]


Expand understanding of grammatical features andused in a range of personal, informative and imaginative texts designed to suit different audiences, contexts and purposes

[Key concepts:purpose, choice, coherence; Key processes: identifying, applying, analysing]

Language variation and change

Understand that Auslan has evolved and developed through different periods of influence and cultural and societal change

[Key concepts: change, evolution, contact, technology; Key processes: identifying, recognising, researching]